Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Water Policy in Alberta: Settler-Colonialism, Community, and Capital

Water Policy in Alberta: Settler-Colonialism, Community, and Capital 204  ✜  J ournal of the S outhwest Water Policy in Alberta: Settler-Colonialism, Community, and Capital J e r e m y J. S c h m i d t In February 2011, Helen Ingram resigned from a high-level panel that had been created to establish a “world-class environmental monitoring system” for Alberta’s massive bitumen extraction industry—the oil sands or tar sands. In Canada, Dr. Ingram’s resignation was national news. Major outlets like The Globe and Mail (Wingrove 2011) and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (McIntosh 2011) recounted her concerns regarding how few scientists were on the panel and how confidentiality clauses created barriers to engagement with indigenous peoples. To opponents of Alberta’s extractive resource sector, it was yet another blow to provincial credibility (see, generally, Black et al. 2014). In the years prior to the panel’s creation, several scientific studies had revealed serious flaws in Alberta’s environmental monitoring system (e.g., Kelly et al. 2009, 2010). And barely a month before the panel was announced, Alberta’s Regional Aquatic Monitoring Program (RAMP) had been excoriated for its inability to detect regional or cumulative effects of oil sands activities, to establish baseline data, or to collect and compare data for environmental impact assessments http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Southwest Southwest Center (Univ of Arizona)

Water Policy in Alberta: Settler-Colonialism, Community, and Capital

Journal of the Southwest , Volume 59 (1) – Jul 13, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/southwest-center-univ-of-arizona/water-policy-in-alberta-settler-colonialism-community-and-capital-f8zmSOPq1N
Publisher
Southwest Center (Univ of Arizona)
Copyright
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
ISSN
2158-1371
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

204  ✜  J ournal of the S outhwest Water Policy in Alberta: Settler-Colonialism, Community, and Capital J e r e m y J. S c h m i d t In February 2011, Helen Ingram resigned from a high-level panel that had been created to establish a “world-class environmental monitoring system” for Alberta’s massive bitumen extraction industry—the oil sands or tar sands. In Canada, Dr. Ingram’s resignation was national news. Major outlets like The Globe and Mail (Wingrove 2011) and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (McIntosh 2011) recounted her concerns regarding how few scientists were on the panel and how confidentiality clauses created barriers to engagement with indigenous peoples. To opponents of Alberta’s extractive resource sector, it was yet another blow to provincial credibility (see, generally, Black et al. 2014). In the years prior to the panel’s creation, several scientific studies had revealed serious flaws in Alberta’s environmental monitoring system (e.g., Kelly et al. 2009, 2010). And barely a month before the panel was announced, Alberta’s Regional Aquatic Monitoring Program (RAMP) had been excoriated for its inability to detect regional or cumulative effects of oil sands activities, to establish baseline data, or to collect and compare data for environmental impact assessments

Journal

Journal of the SouthwestSouthwest Center (Univ of Arizona)

Published: Jul 13, 2017

There are no references for this article.