Violence, Sectarianism, and the Politics of Religion: Articulations of Anti-Shi‘a Discourses in Indonesia

Violence, Sectarianism, and the Politics of Religion: Articulations of Anti-Shi‘a Discourses in... Chiara Formichi Beginning in April 2000, Indonesian Shi`a communities have been the target of violent attacks, with an escalating increase in reported incidents since 2006. Houses and schools have been burnt down, individuals have had stones thrown at them, and praying sessions have been forcefully disbanded. Across the Muslim world this is hardly news, as sectarian strife has plagued the Middle East and South Asia for decades, if not longer. In Indonesia, however, these attacks are, indeed, a new phenomenon, and one that I am reticent to label as strictly "sectarian" in its origin.1 In an attempt to explain why Indonesia has recently experienced a violent turn in approaches to Shi`a Muslims, I situate the surfacing and increase in these attacks in the wider contexts of international politics, changing national political dynamics, legal provisions regulating religious minorities, and the local environment in which the attacks have occurred. Instead of focusing on the micro-dynamics of the attacks, this article concerns itself with the trajectory of the violent turn, bringing national politics Chiara Formichi is an assistant professor in Southeast Asian Humanities, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University. 1 I am grateful to the Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Indonesia Southeast Asia Program [Cornell University]

Violence, Sectarianism, and the Politics of Religion: Articulations of Anti-Shi‘a Discourses in Indonesia

Indonesia, Volume 98 (1) – Nov 26, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/southeast-asia-program-cornell-university/violence-sectarianism-and-the-politics-of-religion-articulations-of-vIQF21zuU7
Publisher
Southeast Asia Program [Cornell University]
Copyright
Copyright @ Cornell Southeast Asia Program
ISSN
2164-8654
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chiara Formichi Beginning in April 2000, Indonesian Shi`a communities have been the target of violent attacks, with an escalating increase in reported incidents since 2006. Houses and schools have been burnt down, individuals have had stones thrown at them, and praying sessions have been forcefully disbanded. Across the Muslim world this is hardly news, as sectarian strife has plagued the Middle East and South Asia for decades, if not longer. In Indonesia, however, these attacks are, indeed, a new phenomenon, and one that I am reticent to label as strictly "sectarian" in its origin.1 In an attempt to explain why Indonesia has recently experienced a violent turn in approaches to Shi`a Muslims, I situate the surfacing and increase in these attacks in the wider contexts of international politics, changing national political dynamics, legal provisions regulating religious minorities, and the local environment in which the attacks have occurred. Instead of focusing on the micro-dynamics of the attacks, this article concerns itself with the trajectory of the violent turn, bringing national politics Chiara Formichi is an assistant professor in Southeast Asian Humanities, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University. 1 I am grateful to the Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en

Journal

IndonesiaSoutheast Asia Program [Cornell University]

Published: Nov 26, 2014

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off