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Political Change and Territoriality in Indonesia: Provincial Proliferation by Ehito Kimura (review)

Political Change and Territoriality in Indonesia: Provincial Proliferation by Ehito Kimura (review) Ehito Kimura. Political Change and Territoriality in Indonesia: Provincial Proliferation. London: Routledge, 2013. 171 pp. Michael Buehler The number of provinces and districts in Indonesia has increased dramatically since Indonesia's political opening in 1998. In his new book, Ehito Kimura asks why this territorial fragmentation has occurred and what it tells us about Indonesian politics.1 His introductory chapter outlines three main arguments. First, new political institutions at the national level created "critical junctures," during which territorial change became possible. Concretely, the introduction of elections and the decentralization of political and fiscal powers created opportunities for political actors to renegotiate territorial boundaries. Second, the actual contours of territorial proliferation are shaped by highly political and contentious processes. The fault lines of these struggles over space and place do not always emerge between the national and subnational level. Rather, alliances that stretch across government layers often explain why administrative fragmentation has taken different forms. Third, the flexibility of the very notion of "territory" needs to be recognized and understood by how it is shaped in the broader historical context. The subsequent three chapters describe the historical context in which territorial politics have unfolded since 1945. Chapter 2 defines key terms, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Indonesia Southeast Asia Program [Cornell University]

Political Change and Territoriality in Indonesia: Provincial Proliferation by Ehito Kimura (review)

Indonesia , Volume 97 (1) – Jun 27, 2014

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Publisher
Southeast Asia Program [Cornell University]
Copyright
Copyright @ Cornell Southeast Asia Program
ISSN
2164-8654
Publisher site
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Abstract

Ehito Kimura. Political Change and Territoriality in Indonesia: Provincial Proliferation. London: Routledge, 2013. 171 pp. Michael Buehler The number of provinces and districts in Indonesia has increased dramatically since Indonesia's political opening in 1998. In his new book, Ehito Kimura asks why this territorial fragmentation has occurred and what it tells us about Indonesian politics.1 His introductory chapter outlines three main arguments. First, new political institutions at the national level created "critical junctures," during which territorial change became possible. Concretely, the introduction of elections and the decentralization of political and fiscal powers created opportunities for political actors to renegotiate territorial boundaries. Second, the actual contours of territorial proliferation are shaped by highly political and contentious processes. The fault lines of these struggles over space and place do not always emerge between the national and subnational level. Rather, alliances that stretch across government layers often explain why administrative fragmentation has taken different forms. Third, the flexibility of the very notion of "territory" needs to be recognized and understood by how it is shaped in the broader historical context. The subsequent three chapters describe the historical context in which territorial politics have unfolded since 1945. Chapter 2 defines key terms,

Journal

IndonesiaSoutheast Asia Program [Cornell University]

Published: Jun 27, 2014

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