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Population Size, Economic Development, and Attitudes Towards Inequality: Evidence from 30 Nations

Population Size, Economic Development, and Attitudes Towards Inequality: Evidence from 30 Nations How does population size affect social life? In accord with Durkheim's classic argument about the shift from the rigid "mechanical" solidarity of small societies to the more differentiated and interdependent "organic" solidarity of large societies, data from 30 nations and 19,568 respondents shows that the citizenry of large societies prefer more inequality in earnings than do citizens of small societies, net of the level of economic development. One reason for this is that citizens of large countries support larger rewards for education and occupational success. In most societies, the actual level of inequality is close to the ideal level, or a little higher. Data are from the World Inequality Study, which pools data from many excellent international survey projects; analysis is by OLS and multi-level regression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Review Sociological Demography Press

Population Size, Economic Development, and Attitudes Towards Inequality: Evidence from 30 Nations

Population Review , Volume 46 (2) – Feb 11, 2007

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Publisher
Sociological Demography Press
Copyright
Copyright © Sociological Demography Press
ISSN
1549-0955
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Abstract

How does population size affect social life? In accord with Durkheim's classic argument about the shift from the rigid "mechanical" solidarity of small societies to the more differentiated and interdependent "organic" solidarity of large societies, data from 30 nations and 19,568 respondents shows that the citizenry of large societies prefer more inequality in earnings than do citizens of small societies, net of the level of economic development. One reason for this is that citizens of large countries support larger rewards for education and occupational success. In most societies, the actual level of inequality is close to the ideal level, or a little higher. Data are from the World Inequality Study, which pools data from many excellent international survey projects; analysis is by OLS and multi-level regression.

Journal

Population ReviewSociological Demography Press

Published: Feb 11, 2007

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