Empirical Stratification Theory: Ibn Khaldun (1377) to Today

Empirical Stratification Theory: Ibn Khaldun (1377) to Today Abstract: The current dispersion of stratification research into several seemingly unrelated topics such as social mobility and various kinds of inequality (racial, ethnic, gender, income, etc.) is unfortunate and unnecessary. It is unfortunate because a good theory can improve understanding of each of these and goes on to open new avenues for the development of theory itself. It is unnecessary because a general theory of stratification in fact exists, though this is not immediately obvious because its expressions have evolved with the passage of time, and because its basic unity is obscured by terminological differences among its contributors. The theory's original form was written in 1377 by Ibn Khaldun as the basis of his theory of human organization (sociology), and was buttressed by his profound knowledge of pre-14 th Century societies. His form of it is a conceptually simple framework consisting of a two-class hierarchy of absolute power, together with an analysis of the rise, dissolution, and replacement of power holding groups. Beginning around a century ago this framework was augmented and elaborated both in terms of a more refined set of dimensions of types of power and of modern statistical concepts by which to describe the structural variations of power in societal stratification systems in any society. The paper reviews the evolution of the theory and brings it up to date. Measurement methods as well the theory's implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Review Sociological Demography Press

Empirical Stratification Theory: Ibn Khaldun (1377) to Today

Population Review, Volume 48 (2) – Nov 17, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sociological-demography-press/empirical-stratification-theory-ibn-khaldun-1377-to-today-VNIyPg4cL0
Publisher
Sociological Demography Press
Copyright
Copyright © Sociological Demography Press
ISSN
1549-0955
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: The current dispersion of stratification research into several seemingly unrelated topics such as social mobility and various kinds of inequality (racial, ethnic, gender, income, etc.) is unfortunate and unnecessary. It is unfortunate because a good theory can improve understanding of each of these and goes on to open new avenues for the development of theory itself. It is unnecessary because a general theory of stratification in fact exists, though this is not immediately obvious because its expressions have evolved with the passage of time, and because its basic unity is obscured by terminological differences among its contributors. The theory's original form was written in 1377 by Ibn Khaldun as the basis of his theory of human organization (sociology), and was buttressed by his profound knowledge of pre-14 th Century societies. His form of it is a conceptually simple framework consisting of a two-class hierarchy of absolute power, together with an analysis of the rise, dissolution, and replacement of power holding groups. Beginning around a century ago this framework was augmented and elaborated both in terms of a more refined set of dimensions of types of power and of modern statistical concepts by which to describe the structural variations of power in societal stratification systems in any society. The paper reviews the evolution of the theory and brings it up to date. Measurement methods as well the theory's implications are discussed.

Journal

Population ReviewSociological Demography Press

Published: Nov 17, 2009

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off