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Writing Daughters: August Strindberg's Other Voices (review)

Writing Daughters: August Strindberg's Other Voices (review) Reviews Eszter Szalczer. Writing Daughters: August Strindberg's Other Voices. London: Norvik, 2008. Pp. 254. So much has been written on Strindberg, many must despair of finding a new angle. Eszter Szalczer has come upon the fresh idea of looking at Strindberg through the lens of his daughters and his relationship to them. The book is divided into two parts. The first part offers readings of an assortment of Strindberg's works, and the second takes a biographical look at Strindberg's four daughters. The first chapter is fascinating. Szalczer locates the presence of a feminine voice in Strindberg's writing by demonstrating how he viewed the process of writing as akin to spiritualist mediumship. Mediumship was generally viewed as a female undertaking in the nineteenth century in that the medium is inhabited by the voices of others. Compare this to the masculine view of authorship as "the singular and unified creative source of a self-assertive utterance" (19). Szalczer amply demonstrates that Strindberg described his own process like a "feverish trance state" (29) during which he is possessed by the characters to whom he gives a voice. She further concludes, "The attraction/repulsion of this feminine creative side of himself acts like an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Studies Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Writing Daughters: August Strindberg's Other Voices (review)

Scandinavian Studies , Volume 84 (1) – Oct 11, 2012

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Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
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Copyright © Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
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2163-8195
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Abstract

Reviews Eszter Szalczer. Writing Daughters: August Strindberg's Other Voices. London: Norvik, 2008. Pp. 254. So much has been written on Strindberg, many must despair of finding a new angle. Eszter Szalczer has come upon the fresh idea of looking at Strindberg through the lens of his daughters and his relationship to them. The book is divided into two parts. The first part offers readings of an assortment of Strindberg's works, and the second takes a biographical look at Strindberg's four daughters. The first chapter is fascinating. Szalczer locates the presence of a feminine voice in Strindberg's writing by demonstrating how he viewed the process of writing as akin to spiritualist mediumship. Mediumship was generally viewed as a female undertaking in the nineteenth century in that the medium is inhabited by the voices of others. Compare this to the masculine view of authorship as "the singular and unified creative source of a self-assertive utterance" (19). Szalczer amply demonstrates that Strindberg described his own process like a "feverish trance state" (29) during which he is possessed by the characters to whom he gives a voice. She further concludes, "The attraction/repulsion of this feminine creative side of himself acts like an

Journal

Scandinavian StudiesSociety for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Published: Oct 11, 2012

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