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Guys and Dolls: Gender, Scale, and the Book in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Novels and Karl Ove Knausgård's Min kamp

Guys and Dolls: Gender, Scale, and the Book in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Novels and Karl... Guys and Dolls: Gender, Scale, and the Book in Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan Novels and Karl Ove Knausgård’s Min kamp Inge van de Ven Tilburg University he Italian Elena Ferrante and the Norwegian Karl Ove Knaus - gård have both recently achieved worldwide fame with book Tseries that are epic in scale, with sweeping panoramic scopes and undeniably maximalist qualities. Knausgår Min d’ kamp s comprises six novels amounting to roughly 3,600 pages, published between 2009 and 2011; Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels tetralogy (2011–2014) totals approximately 1,700 pages. In many other respects, it seems they could not be further apart. They embody total disclosure versus total secrecy; hypervisibility versus invisibility; masculinity versus feminin - ity; fatherhood versus motherhood; the Protestant welfare state of Norway versus a Catholic workers district on the outskirts of Naples; Scandinavian middle class versus South Italian proletariat . . . the list of antitheses could go on. Yet in this article, I argue that, in their own ways, both series render visible certain gender identities and behaviors that for different reasons have long remained unseen. Knausgård and Ferrante in their own ways both exploit the scope and volumetric dimensions of their work in order to destabilize categories of presence and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Studies Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Guys and Dolls: Gender, Scale, and the Book in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Novels and Karl Ove Knausgård's Min kamp

Scandinavian Studies , Volume 92 (3) – Jul 31, 2020

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Publisher
Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
Copyright
Copyright © Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
ISSN
2163-8195

Abstract

Guys and Dolls: Gender, Scale, and the Book in Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan Novels and Karl Ove Knausgård’s Min kamp Inge van de Ven Tilburg University he Italian Elena Ferrante and the Norwegian Karl Ove Knaus - gård have both recently achieved worldwide fame with book Tseries that are epic in scale, with sweeping panoramic scopes and undeniably maximalist qualities. Knausgår Min d’ kamp s comprises six novels amounting to roughly 3,600 pages, published between 2009 and 2011; Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels tetralogy (2011–2014) totals approximately 1,700 pages. In many other respects, it seems they could not be further apart. They embody total disclosure versus total secrecy; hypervisibility versus invisibility; masculinity versus feminin - ity; fatherhood versus motherhood; the Protestant welfare state of Norway versus a Catholic workers district on the outskirts of Naples; Scandinavian middle class versus South Italian proletariat . . . the list of antitheses could go on. Yet in this article, I argue that, in their own ways, both series render visible certain gender identities and behaviors that for different reasons have long remained unseen. Knausgård and Ferrante in their own ways both exploit the scope and volumetric dimensions of their work in order to destabilize categories of presence and

Journal

Scandinavian StudiesSociety for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Published: Jul 31, 2020

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