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Gods and Humans in Medieval Scandinavia: Retying the Bonds by Jonas Wellendorf (review)

Gods and Humans in Medieval Scandinavia: Retying the Bonds by Jonas Wellendorf (review) 552 Scandinavian Studies and Bruno Latour, Abram presents a cogent reading of ǫk Ragnar as a story of willful but witless environmental destruction set in motion by “manifestly deluded” Æsir and their pivotal associate Loki. Abram’s reading sheds light on Vǫluspá, but also on the ways in which leaders and ordinar y people of our time think about the current world’s environmental crisis. Questions of confusion, blame, and gender link the two apocalypses, as do tendencies toward anthropocentrism and a clinging adherence to dualisms and exclusions. To scholarly readers committed to the positivist project of r - econstruct ing what Old Norse mythology was or meant to people at the time of the composition or entextualization of Vǫluspá, Abram’s work will seem hopelessly conjectural and anachronistic. But to a reader interested in the ways in which a medieval text can be read by later ages, Abram’s exploration will prove exhilarating and thought provoking - . The text would work well in a college seminar classroom, precisely because it challenges its readers to think about why we read works of the past and how these works can speak to us today. Abram’s study is a work that contributes vitally to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Studies Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Gods and Humans in Medieval Scandinavia: Retying the Bonds by Jonas Wellendorf (review)

Scandinavian Studies , Volume 92 (4) – Oct 22, 2020

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Publisher
Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
Copyright
Copyright © Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
ISSN
2163-8195

Abstract

552 Scandinavian Studies and Bruno Latour, Abram presents a cogent reading of ǫk Ragnar as a story of willful but witless environmental destruction set in motion by “manifestly deluded” Æsir and their pivotal associate Loki. Abram’s reading sheds light on Vǫluspá, but also on the ways in which leaders and ordinar y people of our time think about the current world’s environmental crisis. Questions of confusion, blame, and gender link the two apocalypses, as do tendencies toward anthropocentrism and a clinging adherence to dualisms and exclusions. To scholarly readers committed to the positivist project of r - econstruct ing what Old Norse mythology was or meant to people at the time of the composition or entextualization of Vǫluspá, Abram’s work will seem hopelessly conjectural and anachronistic. But to a reader interested in the ways in which a medieval text can be read by later ages, Abram’s exploration will prove exhilarating and thought provoking - . The text would work well in a college seminar classroom, precisely because it challenges its readers to think about why we read works of the past and how these works can speak to us today. Abram’s study is a work that contributes vitally to

Journal

Scandinavian StudiesSociety for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Published: Oct 22, 2020

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