Cross-Dressing in the Poetic Edda: Mic muno Æsir argan kalla

Cross-Dressing in the Poetic Edda: Mic muno Æsir argan kalla Mic muno Æsir argan kalla James Frankki Sam Houston State University his article examines the concept of cross-dressing as portrayed in one of the most prominent of the Scandinavian mythological poems: the "Þrymsqviða."1 In this eddic lay, Thor adorns himself in women's clothing and journeys to the land of the giants, where Thrym has absconded with his hammer.2 The giant is willing to return Thor's hammer under one condition: that he be given the goddess Freyja for his wife. On the advice of Heimdal and seconded by Loki, Thor reluctantly agrees to dress himself in Freyja's bridal linen and travel to Jötunheimar in her stead. Not surprisingly, Loki--whose claim to fame rests on his gender-bending antics3--offers to accompany Thor as his "bridesmaid." Thor's attire includes not only a wedding dress, but many of the accouterments of thirteenth-century bridal fashion: a woman's head-dress, a veil,4 expensive jewelry, brooches, and even a new bride's household keys. What follows is the sartorial advice offered by Heimdal and Loki: 1. This paper is a revised and expanded version of a conference paper presented at the SASS conference in Madison, Wisconsin, on May 2, 2009. 2. For a discussion of Thor, his attributes, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Studies Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Cross-Dressing in the Poetic Edda: Mic muno Æsir argan kalla

Scandinavian Studies, Volume 84 (4) – Aug 23, 2012

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Publisher
Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
Copyright
Copyright © Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study
ISSN
2163-8195
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Abstract

Mic muno Æsir argan kalla James Frankki Sam Houston State University his article examines the concept of cross-dressing as portrayed in one of the most prominent of the Scandinavian mythological poems: the "Þrymsqviða."1 In this eddic lay, Thor adorns himself in women's clothing and journeys to the land of the giants, where Thrym has absconded with his hammer.2 The giant is willing to return Thor's hammer under one condition: that he be given the goddess Freyja for his wife. On the advice of Heimdal and seconded by Loki, Thor reluctantly agrees to dress himself in Freyja's bridal linen and travel to Jötunheimar in her stead. Not surprisingly, Loki--whose claim to fame rests on his gender-bending antics3--offers to accompany Thor as his "bridesmaid." Thor's attire includes not only a wedding dress, but many of the accouterments of thirteenth-century bridal fashion: a woman's head-dress, a veil,4 expensive jewelry, brooches, and even a new bride's household keys. What follows is the sartorial advice offered by Heimdal and Loki: 1. This paper is a revised and expanded version of a conference paper presented at the SASS conference in Madison, Wisconsin, on May 2, 2009. 2. For a discussion of Thor, his attributes,

Journal

Scandinavian StudiesSociety for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study

Published: Aug 23, 2012

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