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When the Earth Roars: Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan by Gregory Smits (review)

When the Earth Roars: Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan by Gregory Smits (review) There is no doubt that Yamamoto funded (and profited from) important intellectual and cultural activities and in so doing was pivotal in enabling and disseminating the achievements of others. Though this reader considers Yamamoto's precise "intellectual contributions" (let alone his motivations) to still be in some doubt, there is no question that Keaveney does achieve another goal that is arguably of greater importance: he reminds us of the powerful and multifaceted influence that the publishing company Kaizosha ¯ had on a great many readers and writers, with repercussions that are still being felt to this day. When the Earth Roars: Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan. By Gregory Smits. Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, Md., 2014. xvi, 209 pages. $80.00, cloth; $79.99, E-book. Reviewed by Jeff Kingston Temple University Japan The Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011 killed nearly 16,000 people in the tsunami zone of northeastern Japan and has indelibly marked the lives of survivors from that cataclysm, including, as of early 2015, over 100,000 nuclear refugees. In the immediate aftermath, Prime Minister Kan Naoto described it as the worst disaster since World War II, while Governor of Tokyo Ishihara Shintaro suggested it was divine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

When the Earth Roars: Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan by Gregory Smits (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 41 (2) – Jul 30, 2015

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

There is no doubt that Yamamoto funded (and profited from) important intellectual and cultural activities and in so doing was pivotal in enabling and disseminating the achievements of others. Though this reader considers Yamamoto's precise "intellectual contributions" (let alone his motivations) to still be in some doubt, there is no question that Keaveney does achieve another goal that is arguably of greater importance: he reminds us of the powerful and multifaceted influence that the publishing company Kaizosha ¯ had on a great many readers and writers, with repercussions that are still being felt to this day. When the Earth Roars: Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan. By Gregory Smits. Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, Md., 2014. xvi, 209 pages. $80.00, cloth; $79.99, E-book. Reviewed by Jeff Kingston Temple University Japan The Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011 killed nearly 16,000 people in the tsunami zone of northeastern Japan and has indelibly marked the lives of survivors from that cataclysm, including, as of early 2015, over 100,000 nuclear refugees. In the immediate aftermath, Prime Minister Kan Naoto described it as the worst disaster since World War II, while Governor of Tokyo Ishihara Shintaro suggested it was divine

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2015

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