The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the "Opening" of Japan (review)

The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the "Opening" of Japan (review) harder on the "military class" than on other members of society (p. 206). Certainly it is true that the surge in confiscations of daimyo (particularly fudai) land under Tsunayoshi must have caused considerable resentment and unease among the ranks of the warriors, but here again there is good reason to doubt the samurai were alone in their concerns. After all, among the key financial innovations of Tsunayoshi's reign were both the introduction of new taxes on commerce and transportation (unjokin), which allowed ¯ the bakufu systematically to extract income from the merchant class for the first time, and a new stricter land survey that was designed to ensure that increases in agricultural production resulting from improved farming methods and newly developed fields (i.e., the labor and ingenuity of peasants) did not escape the tax collector's net. For those whose pockets were drained by it, efficiency of this kind must hardly have seemed "benevolent." To suggest that Tsunayoshi was ultimately less concerned with the welfare of "the people" than he was with strengthening the economic foundations of his government or pursuing policies he believed (for whatever reason) were morally important is not to argue that we should simply re-embrace http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the "Opening" of Japan (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/society-for-japanese-studies/the-vaccinators-smallpox-medical-knowledge-and-the-opening-of-japan-Yf4sZ2kpBC
Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Japanese Studies
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

harder on the "military class" than on other members of society (p. 206). Certainly it is true that the surge in confiscations of daimyo (particularly fudai) land under Tsunayoshi must have caused considerable resentment and unease among the ranks of the warriors, but here again there is good reason to doubt the samurai were alone in their concerns. After all, among the key financial innovations of Tsunayoshi's reign were both the introduction of new taxes on commerce and transportation (unjokin), which allowed ¯ the bakufu systematically to extract income from the merchant class for the first time, and a new stricter land survey that was designed to ensure that increases in agricultural production resulting from improved farming methods and newly developed fields (i.e., the labor and ingenuity of peasants) did not escape the tax collector's net. For those whose pockets were drained by it, efficiency of this kind must hardly have seemed "benevolent." To suggest that Tsunayoshi was ultimately less concerned with the welfare of "the people" than he was with strengthening the economic foundations of his government or pursuing policies he believed (for whatever reason) were morally important is not to argue that we should simply re-embrace

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jan 15, 2009

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off