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The Strange Child: Education and the Psychology of Patriotism in Recessionary Japan by Andrea Gevurtz Arai (review)

The Strange Child: Education and the Psychology of Patriotism in Recessionary Japan by Andrea... The Strange Child: Education and the Psychology of Patriotism in Recessionary Japan. By Andrea Gevurtz Arai. Stanford University Press, Stanford, 2016. xvi, 233 pages. $85.00, cloth; $25.95, paper. Reviewed by Christine R. Yano University of Hawai‘i at Manoa ¯ Scholarly works on recessionary Japan and the triple disaster of 2011 have become a genre of research that periodizes contemporary life. Within a neat 20-year span, 1991 began the domino effect of change that 2011 seemed to physicalize with destruction of mythic proportions, an isomorphic natural and manmade armageddon. Anthropologist Andrea Gevurtz Arai’s research takes as its backdrop this frame of Japan’s recent cataclysmic events: economic changes in the bursting of the bubble; social changes in the dismantling of postwar structures of family and well-being; and natural and linked manmade disasters in the Kobe earthquake of 1995 and the ongoing Tohoku catastrophe. These events are not unrelated, and Arai details ways in which these link up in people’s minds in deeply unsettling ways. Based upon initial fieldwork from 1999 through 2001, and extended with return visits to Tokyo, Kobe, and Kochi through 2014, this book has benefited greatly from the processes of long-term research resulting in a complexly woven http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The Strange Child: Education and the Psychology of Patriotism in Recessionary Japan by Andrea Gevurtz Arai (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 43 (2) – Jul 22, 2017

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Strange Child: Education and the Psychology of Patriotism in Recessionary Japan. By Andrea Gevurtz Arai. Stanford University Press, Stanford, 2016. xvi, 233 pages. $85.00, cloth; $25.95, paper. Reviewed by Christine R. Yano University of Hawai‘i at Manoa ¯ Scholarly works on recessionary Japan and the triple disaster of 2011 have become a genre of research that periodizes contemporary life. Within a neat 20-year span, 1991 began the domino effect of change that 2011 seemed to physicalize with destruction of mythic proportions, an isomorphic natural and manmade armageddon. Anthropologist Andrea Gevurtz Arai’s research takes as its backdrop this frame of Japan’s recent cataclysmic events: economic changes in the bursting of the bubble; social changes in the dismantling of postwar structures of family and well-being; and natural and linked manmade disasters in the Kobe earthquake of 1995 and the ongoing Tohoku catastrophe. These events are not unrelated, and Arai details ways in which these link up in people’s minds in deeply unsettling ways. Based upon initial fieldwork from 1999 through 2001, and extended with return visits to Tokyo, Kobe, and Kochi through 2014, this book has benefited greatly from the processes of long-term research resulting in a complexly woven

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 22, 2017

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