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The Prints of Isoda Koryusai: Floating World Culture and Its Consumers in Eighteenth-Century Japan (review)

The Prints of Isoda Koryusai: Floating World Culture and Its Consumers in Eighteenth-Century... gaze reflected in part a greater concern with domestic troubles as well as pressures from the outside, namely, the growing threat from abroad. Like the fiction of the late eighteenth century which is one of its foci, this book requires a careful reading to benefit fully from its nuanced narrative, but its wealth of insight into the changing cultural landscape during a major portion of the Tokugawa era make it well worth the effort. That effort is made easier by a generous number of illustrations that aid the reader in mapping out the book's terrain. Yonemoto's scholarship intersects with other work in Japanese early modern literature, history, and popular culture, and her spatial approach does much to enrich existing scholarship. Indeed, this work's high level of sophistication is a sign of the maturation of the field. The Prints of Isoda Koryusai: Floating World Culture and Its Consumers in ¯ Eighteenth-Century Japan. By Allen Hockley. University of Washington Press, Seattle, 2003. 313 pages. $60.00. Reviewed by TIMON SCREECH SOAS, University of London Allen Hockley has written a many-faceted book. Its title is striking. Few recent tomes bear such stark, canon-building designations. Hockley's decision to address the prints of Isoda http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The Prints of Isoda Koryusai: Floating World Culture and Its Consumers in Eighteenth-Century Japan (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 30 (2) – Jul 30, 2004

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

gaze reflected in part a greater concern with domestic troubles as well as pressures from the outside, namely, the growing threat from abroad. Like the fiction of the late eighteenth century which is one of its foci, this book requires a careful reading to benefit fully from its nuanced narrative, but its wealth of insight into the changing cultural landscape during a major portion of the Tokugawa era make it well worth the effort. That effort is made easier by a generous number of illustrations that aid the reader in mapping out the book's terrain. Yonemoto's scholarship intersects with other work in Japanese early modern literature, history, and popular culture, and her spatial approach does much to enrich existing scholarship. Indeed, this work's high level of sophistication is a sign of the maturation of the field. The Prints of Isoda Koryusai: Floating World Culture and Its Consumers in ¯ Eighteenth-Century Japan. By Allen Hockley. University of Washington Press, Seattle, 2003. 313 pages. $60.00. Reviewed by TIMON SCREECH SOAS, University of London Allen Hockley has written a many-faceted book. Its title is striking. Few recent tomes bear such stark, canon-building designations. Hockley's decision to address the prints of Isoda

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2004

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