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The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (review)

The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (review) Review Section The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan. By Barbara Sato. Duke University Press, Durham, 2003. xiv, 241 pages. $59.95, cloth; $19.95, paper. Reviewed by SALLY A. HASTINGS Purdue University Barbara Sato sets out to examine three new types of urban women--the modern girl, the housewife, and the professional working woman--that appeared in magazines, books, and movies of the interwar years, most especially in mass women's magazines. The modern girl, an icon of consumerism, sported bobbed hair and short skirts in advertisements for beer, wine, and cosmetics and figured prominently in the writings of leftist critics. The self-motivated middle-class housewife found herself reflected in the articles on family, cooking, housework, and clothing in the pages of women's magazines, but such publications also contained fiction and confessional articles that allowed her to imagine her life with romance and glamour. The professional working women in department stores and offices earned wages and operated in public rather than domestic space. In distilling her rich knowledge of interwar culture and her considerable grasp of secondary and theoretical literature into the limited space of a book, Sato uses a tight framework of a foundational essay and three substantive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 30 (2) – Jul 30, 2004

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

Review Section The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan. By Barbara Sato. Duke University Press, Durham, 2003. xiv, 241 pages. $59.95, cloth; $19.95, paper. Reviewed by SALLY A. HASTINGS Purdue University Barbara Sato sets out to examine three new types of urban women--the modern girl, the housewife, and the professional working woman--that appeared in magazines, books, and movies of the interwar years, most especially in mass women's magazines. The modern girl, an icon of consumerism, sported bobbed hair and short skirts in advertisements for beer, wine, and cosmetics and figured prominently in the writings of leftist critics. The self-motivated middle-class housewife found herself reflected in the articles on family, cooking, housework, and clothing in the pages of women's magazines, but such publications also contained fiction and confessional articles that allowed her to imagine her life with romance and glamour. The professional working women in department stores and offices earned wages and operated in public rather than domestic space. In distilling her rich knowledge of interwar culture and her considerable grasp of secondary and theoretical literature into the limited space of a book, Sato uses a tight framework of a foundational essay and three substantive

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2004

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