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Sea Rovers, Silver, and Samurai: Maritime East Asia in Global History, 1550–1700 ed. by Tonio Andrade and Xing Hang (review)

Sea Rovers, Silver, and Samurai: Maritime East Asia in Global History, 1550–1700 ed. by Tonio... question of a book like this: what does it mean to write a book about this subject in an age defined by databases, curated websites, and all manner of digital projects? After all, the book as a form is inherently limiting in ways that seem at odds with the spirit of the project: it is limited by length, thus circumscribing the number of plays that can be presented; it cannot capture many of the performative dimensions of the genre, especially voice, which seem so critical to any historical reckoning with a form like this; and it is static in the sense that it cannot be added to or expanded, or at least only with great cost. But part of the answer to this question of form is itself hinted at in the history of the kamishibai themselves: these seemingly fragile, ephemeral objects have survived in large part because of the durability of paper and because they do not require a special device for preservation or feedback.3 Indeed, in an age of digital projects in which long-term preservation and archiving is always a critical issue, the preservation of these objects again in paper seems to provide one of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Sea Rovers, Silver, and Samurai: Maritime East Asia in Global History, 1550–1700 ed. by Tonio Andrade and Xing Hang (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 43 (2) – Jul 22, 2017

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

question of a book like this: what does it mean to write a book about this subject in an age defined by databases, curated websites, and all manner of digital projects? After all, the book as a form is inherently limiting in ways that seem at odds with the spirit of the project: it is limited by length, thus circumscribing the number of plays that can be presented; it cannot capture many of the performative dimensions of the genre, especially voice, which seem so critical to any historical reckoning with a form like this; and it is static in the sense that it cannot be added to or expanded, or at least only with great cost. But part of the answer to this question of form is itself hinted at in the history of the kamishibai themselves: these seemingly fragile, ephemeral objects have survived in large part because of the durability of paper and because they do not require a special device for preservation or feedback.3 Indeed, in an age of digital projects in which long-term preservation and archiving is always a critical issue, the preservation of these objects again in paper seems to provide one of the

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 22, 2017

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