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Regionalizing Culture: The Political Economy of Japanese Popular Culture in Asia by Nissim Kadosh Otmazgin (review)

Regionalizing Culture: The Political Economy of Japanese Popular Culture in Asia by Nissim Kadosh... esis that Japan's "lost decade" was not really lost but rather was a period of transformation. The hypothesis itself is a plausible one that deserves serious examination. The empirical chapters of the book, however, fall short of being a starting point for such an examination. Each empirical chapter raises a potentially interesting issue, but it is not tied to the discussion on Japan's transformation that is developed in earlier chapters. This disjuncture limits the contribution of the book in helping our understanding of the recent couple of decades in Japan. Regionalizing Culture: The Political Economy of Japanese Popular Culture in Asia. By Nissim Kadosh Otmazgin. University of Hawai`i Press, Honolulu, 2013. xxv, 230 pages. $42.00. Reviewed by Deborah Shamoon National University of Singapore The academic study of Japanese popular culture has in the last ten years transformed from an underresearched, undertheorized niche into a major force in Japan studies. Publications particularly on anime, such as those by Thomas Lamarre, Marc Steinberg, and Ian Condry, as well as translations of key works by Japanese scholars such as Azuma Hiroko and Saito Tamaki ¯ have propelled this research in serious, theoretically complex directions.1 However, expansion has not spread equally across http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Regionalizing Culture: The Political Economy of Japanese Popular Culture in Asia by Nissim Kadosh Otmazgin (review)

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

esis that Japan's "lost decade" was not really lost but rather was a period of transformation. The hypothesis itself is a plausible one that deserves serious examination. The empirical chapters of the book, however, fall short of being a starting point for such an examination. Each empirical chapter raises a potentially interesting issue, but it is not tied to the discussion on Japan's transformation that is developed in earlier chapters. This disjuncture limits the contribution of the book in helping our understanding of the recent couple of decades in Japan. Regionalizing Culture: The Political Economy of Japanese Popular Culture in Asia. By Nissim Kadosh Otmazgin. University of Hawai`i Press, Honolulu, 2013. xxv, 230 pages. $42.00. Reviewed by Deborah Shamoon National University of Singapore The academic study of Japanese popular culture has in the last ten years transformed from an underresearched, undertheorized niche into a major force in Japan studies. Publications particularly on anime, such as those by Thomas Lamarre, Marc Steinberg, and Ian Condry, as well as translations of key works by Japanese scholars such as Azuma Hiroko and Saito Tamaki ¯ have propelled this research in serious, theoretically complex directions.1 However, expansion has not spread equally across

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2015

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