Nature’s Embrace: Japan’s Aging Urbanites and New Death Rites (review)

Nature’s Embrace: Japan’s Aging Urbanites and New Death Rites (review) There is no doubt, therefore, that great demand exists for further research by Brinton that addresses some of these broader, increasingly pressing challenges so as to peer beyond the fascinating, but now inequitable, school-work mechanisms that Lost in Transition--a rare gem and compulsory reading for all scholars of Japanese youth issues--so skillfully unveils. Such a sequel might benefit from a close conversation with policy-oriented studies such as Tim Jackson's Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet (Routledge, 2009) in considering the future of youth and work in Japan from an expanded, more global perspective. Nature's Embrace: Japan's Aging Urbanites and New Death Rites. By Satsuki Kawano. University of Hawai`i Press, Honolulu, 2010. x, 220 pages. $47.00, cloth; $27.00, paper. Reviewed by Sawa Kurotani University of Redlands Death and dying are universal human experiences, yet the ways in which human beings interpret, cope with, and ritualize death are varied and ever shifting. Careful analysis of social and cultural constructions of death and death rituals, therefore, tells us a great deal about life in a particular society at a particular moment in time. Satsuki Kawano, in her close examination of new death rites among contemporary urban Japanese, untangles a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Nature’s Embrace: Japan’s Aging Urbanites and New Death Rites (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies, Volume 38 (2) – Jul 14, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

There is no doubt, therefore, that great demand exists for further research by Brinton that addresses some of these broader, increasingly pressing challenges so as to peer beyond the fascinating, but now inequitable, school-work mechanisms that Lost in Transition--a rare gem and compulsory reading for all scholars of Japanese youth issues--so skillfully unveils. Such a sequel might benefit from a close conversation with policy-oriented studies such as Tim Jackson's Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet (Routledge, 2009) in considering the future of youth and work in Japan from an expanded, more global perspective. Nature's Embrace: Japan's Aging Urbanites and New Death Rites. By Satsuki Kawano. University of Hawai`i Press, Honolulu, 2010. x, 220 pages. $47.00, cloth; $27.00, paper. Reviewed by Sawa Kurotani University of Redlands Death and dying are universal human experiences, yet the ways in which human beings interpret, cope with, and ritualize death are varied and ever shifting. Careful analysis of social and cultural constructions of death and death rituals, therefore, tells us a great deal about life in a particular society at a particular moment in time. Satsuki Kawano, in her close examination of new death rites among contemporary urban Japanese, untangles a

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 14, 2012

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