Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (review)

Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (review) with Tokyo's preference for autonomy and prestige as with simple damage control in the face of U.S. Middle Eastern policies fundamentally harming Japanese (as well as European) interests. The book gives a most useful analysis of how Japan got where it is now with its foreign and security policies. It may not, however, give a more satisfying answer to the question of whether Japan can simply continue to expand its security ties with the United States (with--according to Samuels-- the possible long-term benefit of gaining more autonomy) while China is increasingly limiting the effectiveness of Western policies through its military strength and the growing economic links with the United States and Japan. But, of course, we need first to understand where we are now and how we got there. Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose. By Kenneth B. Pyle. PublicAffairs, New York, 2007. xiv, 433 pages. $29.95. Reviewed by Thomas U. Berger Boston University Kenneth Pyle has done the seemingly impossible: he has taken the grand sweep of Japanese diplomatic history, from the Tokugawa period to today, with all its trials and tribulations, magnificent triumphs and terrible reversals, and produced a powerful narrative that is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies, Volume 35 (1) – Jan 15, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/society-for-japanese-studies/japan-rising-the-resurgence-of-japanese-power-and-purpose-review-wRJML2AAlv
Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Japanese Studies
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

with Tokyo's preference for autonomy and prestige as with simple damage control in the face of U.S. Middle Eastern policies fundamentally harming Japanese (as well as European) interests. The book gives a most useful analysis of how Japan got where it is now with its foreign and security policies. It may not, however, give a more satisfying answer to the question of whether Japan can simply continue to expand its security ties with the United States (with--according to Samuels-- the possible long-term benefit of gaining more autonomy) while China is increasingly limiting the effectiveness of Western policies through its military strength and the growing economic links with the United States and Japan. But, of course, we need first to understand where we are now and how we got there. Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose. By Kenneth B. Pyle. PublicAffairs, New York, 2007. xiv, 433 pages. $29.95. Reviewed by Thomas U. Berger Boston University Kenneth Pyle has done the seemingly impossible: he has taken the grand sweep of Japanese diplomatic history, from the Tokugawa period to today, with all its trials and tribulations, magnificent triumphs and terrible reversals, and produced a powerful narrative that is

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jan 15, 2009

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off