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Immortal Wishes: Labor and Transcendence on a Japanese Sacred Mountain (review)

Immortal Wishes: Labor and Transcendence on a Japanese Sacred Mountain (review) documents translated come from a wide range of sources, most of them sufficiently obscure that my university's library does not have the originals for me to check, but I assume them to be reliable. To offer a small exception to that rule, I think the phrase "Hitomaro was born and naturally made efforts" should have been rendered "Hitomaro was born and certainly [or maybe "indeed," masa ni] made efforts." I spotted very few questionable romanizations, and they looked more like typos than mistakes. Those are the best quibbles I can come up with. The scholarship is solid. The bibliography too is interesting, for it reveals that, while I for one was not looking, new studies on Shinto and syncretic religion have been ap¯ pearing, even in English. Some of them are by authors represented in this volume. Presumably those whose speciality is Japanese religion will have read these and thus may not be quite so pleasantly surprised by this volume as I was. Still, I am confident that even specialists will find much in it that interests them and, for the rest of us, it offers valuable insights into unfamiliar areas of traditional Japanese culture. Immortal Wishes: Labor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Immortal Wishes: Labor and Transcendence on a Japanese Sacred Mountain (review)

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

documents translated come from a wide range of sources, most of them sufficiently obscure that my university's library does not have the originals for me to check, but I assume them to be reliable. To offer a small exception to that rule, I think the phrase "Hitomaro was born and naturally made efforts" should have been rendered "Hitomaro was born and certainly [or maybe "indeed," masa ni] made efforts." I spotted very few questionable romanizations, and they looked more like typos than mistakes. Those are the best quibbles I can come up with. The scholarship is solid. The bibliography too is interesting, for it reveals that, while I for one was not looking, new studies on Shinto and syncretic religion have been ap¯ pearing, even in English. Some of them are by authors represented in this volume. Presumably those whose speciality is Japanese religion will have read these and thus may not be quite so pleasantly surprised by this volume as I was. Still, I am confident that even specialists will find much in it that interests them and, for the rest of us, it offers valuable insights into unfamiliar areas of traditional Japanese culture. Immortal Wishes: Labor

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2004

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