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Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment by Pamela D. Winfield (review)

Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment by Pamela... illuminating example of the different ways these two playwrights conceptualized their shared art. The final chapter reviews modern scholarship on furyu, principally ¯ through a comparison of Funabenkei, another of Nobumitsu's well-known works, and Zeami's Kiyotsune, one of Zeami's most inward-looking and past-oriented warrior no plays. In contrasting Kiyotsune with one of No¯ bumitsu's most ostentatious and exciting works, Lim points out how the basic no form could, during the Muromachi age, also accommodate plays ¯ that fundamentally are visual, active, and rich in spectacle. But without real treatises, there is no interpretive structure to help guide us through Nobumitsu's plays. In contrast, Zeami's focus on literary source material as well as the intense use of poetry in his texts help those works stand on their own as literature and drama, even without the scaffolding of his treatises. Lim encourages the reader to consider what we cannot see in a Nobumitsu script and to remember that these missing elements were in large part the foundation of his plays' success. Another Stage provides students of no with tools to appreciate Nobu¯ mitsu, his plays, and his time. Parts 1 and 3 outline major trends in no ¯ scholarship and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment by Pamela D. Winfield (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 41 (2) – Jul 30, 2015

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

illuminating example of the different ways these two playwrights conceptualized their shared art. The final chapter reviews modern scholarship on furyu, principally ¯ through a comparison of Funabenkei, another of Nobumitsu's well-known works, and Zeami's Kiyotsune, one of Zeami's most inward-looking and past-oriented warrior no plays. In contrasting Kiyotsune with one of No¯ bumitsu's most ostentatious and exciting works, Lim points out how the basic no form could, during the Muromachi age, also accommodate plays ¯ that fundamentally are visual, active, and rich in spectacle. But without real treatises, there is no interpretive structure to help guide us through Nobumitsu's plays. In contrast, Zeami's focus on literary source material as well as the intense use of poetry in his texts help those works stand on their own as literature and drama, even without the scaffolding of his treatises. Lim encourages the reader to consider what we cannot see in a Nobumitsu script and to remember that these missing elements were in large part the foundation of his plays' success. Another Stage provides students of no with tools to appreciate Nobu¯ mitsu, his plays, and his time. Parts 1 and 3 outline major trends in no ¯ scholarship and

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2015

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