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Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World Edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi Tsuji (review)

Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World Edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi... that achieved critical acclaim in the West in the early 1950s--Rashomon (1950), Ugetsu monogatari (Tales of moonlight and rain, 1953) and Sansho ¯ dayu (Sansho the bailiff, 1954)--and it is here that I raise an objection. And ¯ ¯ that is the lack of a strong conclusion that effectively sums up the findings of the research in an articulate and concise manner: as it stands, the conclusion accounts for two pages under the heading "Lighting Matters" tacked onto the final chapter which, considering the length of the study and the complexities of its arguments, in the opinion of this reviewer, does not do justice to the study. In conclusion, the central thesis of the book probematizes much of what has been published in English on early Japanese cinema to date. As such, the work is a welcome addition to existing studies by Joanne Bernardi, Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano, and Aaron Gerow.5 However, it raises many questions and will undoubtedly provoke further comments and studies. Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World. Edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi Tsuji. Yale University Press, New Haven, 2012. xxxi, 320 pages. $35.00, paper; $35.00, E-book. Reviewed by D. P. Martinez SOAS, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World Edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi Tsuji (review)

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

that achieved critical acclaim in the West in the early 1950s--Rashomon (1950), Ugetsu monogatari (Tales of moonlight and rain, 1953) and Sansho ¯ dayu (Sansho the bailiff, 1954)--and it is here that I raise an objection. And ¯ ¯ that is the lack of a strong conclusion that effectively sums up the findings of the research in an articulate and concise manner: as it stands, the conclusion accounts for two pages under the heading "Lighting Matters" tacked onto the final chapter which, considering the length of the study and the complexities of its arguments, in the opinion of this reviewer, does not do justice to the study. In conclusion, the central thesis of the book probematizes much of what has been published in English on early Japanese cinema to date. As such, the work is a welcome addition to existing studies by Joanne Bernardi, Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano, and Aaron Gerow.5 However, it raises many questions and will undoubtedly provoke further comments and studies. Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World. Edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi Tsuji. Yale University Press, New Haven, 2012. xxxi, 320 pages. $35.00, paper; $35.00, E-book. Reviewed by D. P. Martinez SOAS,

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 19, 2014

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