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Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912 by Hwansoo Ilmee Kim (review)

Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912 by Hwansoo Ilmee Kim (review) One must not forget on this seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II, in which Nazi Germany and radical Shinto ultranationalist Japan ¯ were the main belligerents, that the death toll, according to the latest research on fatality figures, ranged from 60 to 80 million people, making it the deadliest war in human history. To suggest that the root cause of Japan's belligerency in this war was "irresponsibility" or "discretionary power" in the Japanese system or was just plain "militarism" is preposterous. Sasamoto-Collins alludes to the fact that a new assertive type of nationalism and extremist politics emerged in the 1930s, but she never really tries to explain them or identify the thinkers of extremist right-wing thought and ideology behind this new nationalism in which to better situate her "three post-Restoration radicals." In this sense, the book is a disappointment. Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877­1912. By Hwansoo Ilmee Kim. Harvard University Asia Center, Cambridge, Mass., 2012. xxvi, 415 pages. $49.95. Reviewed by Trent Maxey Amherst College Hwansoo Ilmee Kim's lengthy study examines interactions between Korean and Japanese Buddhism during the decades leading up to the annexation of Korea in 1910. Kim uses http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912 by Hwansoo Ilmee Kim (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 41 (2) – Jul 30, 2015

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
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Abstract

One must not forget on this seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II, in which Nazi Germany and radical Shinto ultranationalist Japan ¯ were the main belligerents, that the death toll, according to the latest research on fatality figures, ranged from 60 to 80 million people, making it the deadliest war in human history. To suggest that the root cause of Japan's belligerency in this war was "irresponsibility" or "discretionary power" in the Japanese system or was just plain "militarism" is preposterous. Sasamoto-Collins alludes to the fact that a new assertive type of nationalism and extremist politics emerged in the 1930s, but she never really tries to explain them or identify the thinkers of extremist right-wing thought and ideology behind this new nationalism in which to better situate her "three post-Restoration radicals." In this sense, the book is a disappointment. Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877­1912. By Hwansoo Ilmee Kim. Harvard University Asia Center, Cambridge, Mass., 2012. xxvi, 415 pages. $49.95. Reviewed by Trent Maxey Amherst College Hwansoo Ilmee Kim's lengthy study examines interactions between Korean and Japanese Buddhism during the decades leading up to the annexation of Korea in 1910. Kim uses

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2015

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