Down and Out in Negishi: Reclusion and Struggle in an Edo Suburb

Down and Out in Negishi: Reclusion and Struggle in an Edo Suburb Abstract: As administratively ambiguous zones, suburbs in early modern Japan (1600–1868) became favored as secluded sites conducive to self-reinvention. The community occupying Negishi in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries provides an apt case study of how, in violation of segregation laws, individuals from all status groups came to live together in privatized outlying aesthetic spaces. The result was the emergence of a comparatively horizontal, egalitarian, and self-sustaining community that embraced and challenged contemporary utopian representations of meisho (celebrated spots). Documents produced by Negishi residents reveal an array of living experiences that complicate, and occasionally subvert, our view of suburban spaces and lifestyles. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Down and Out in Negishi: Reclusion and Struggle in an Edo Suburb

The Journal of Japanese Studies, Volume 35 (1) – Jan 15, 2009

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Japanese Studies
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: As administratively ambiguous zones, suburbs in early modern Japan (1600–1868) became favored as secluded sites conducive to self-reinvention. The community occupying Negishi in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries provides an apt case study of how, in violation of segregation laws, individuals from all status groups came to live together in privatized outlying aesthetic spaces. The result was the emergence of a comparatively horizontal, egalitarian, and self-sustaining community that embraced and challenged contemporary utopian representations of meisho (celebrated spots). Documents produced by Negishi residents reveal an array of living experiences that complicate, and occasionally subvert, our view of suburban spaces and lifestyles.

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jan 15, 2009

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