Channeling the Undercurrents: Fūsetsudome , Information Access, and National Political Awareness in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Channeling the Undercurrents: Fūsetsudome , Information Access, and National Political Awareness... Abstract: While knowledge and network revolutions spread information publicly across social classes in early modern Japan, the emergence of fūsetsudome —private compilations of political documents—reveals that intellectuals, even in far-flung regions, increasingly accessed uncensored political information. This article contextualizes fūsetsudome alongside public media and demonstrates how merchant-class painter and kokugaku scholar Hirao Rosen of Hirosaki in Japan's distant north made two such compilations to document Matthew C. Perry's arrival and the Meiji Restoration. Fūsetsudome indicate wide national political awareness by the 1850s and reveal how commoner-class intellectuals accessed uncensored political information through interaction with samurai connected to political authority. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Channeling the Undercurrents: Fūsetsudome , Information Access, and National Political Awareness in Nineteenth-Century Japan

The Journal of Japanese Studies, Volume 43 (2) – Jul 22, 2017

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: While knowledge and network revolutions spread information publicly across social classes in early modern Japan, the emergence of fūsetsudome —private compilations of political documents—reveals that intellectuals, even in far-flung regions, increasingly accessed uncensored political information. This article contextualizes fūsetsudome alongside public media and demonstrates how merchant-class painter and kokugaku scholar Hirao Rosen of Hirosaki in Japan's distant north made two such compilations to document Matthew C. Perry's arrival and the Meiji Restoration. Fūsetsudome indicate wide national political awareness by the 1850s and reveal how commoner-class intellectuals accessed uncensored political information through interaction with samurai connected to political authority.

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 22, 2017

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