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Brewed in Japan: The Evolution of the Japanese Beer Industry by Jeffrey W. Alexander (review)

Brewed in Japan: The Evolution of the Japanese Beer Industry by Jeffrey W. Alexander (review) other tools from the former military factories in the nation.3 During the Korean War, the U.S. military purchased many of its military supplies from Japanese companies. While it may be true that former military engineers had a profound no-war commitment in the immediate postwar period and rejected military-related research and development, it would be helpful to know more about the engineers who contributed to the development of Japan's postwar military industries. As is true of most books, this one includes minor issues and errors. Nishiyama's study uses Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish sources, but neither the endnotes nor the bibliography include translations of the non-English titles, and few of these titles are translated into English within the text. Readers without foreign language skills who wish to have some idea of his sources may be disappointed with the absence of these translations. Factual errors include conversions from acreage to tsubo: 1,429 acres is not 43,220 tsubo, but 1,749,344 tsubo (p. 112); 9.5 acres is not 271 tsubo, but 11,629 tsubo (p. 113); and 14 acres is not 426 tsubo, but 17,138 tsubo (p. 113). In addition, "Prime Minister Yoshida Hitoshi" (p. 111) should be "Prime Minister Yoshida http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Brewed in Japan: The Evolution of the Japanese Beer Industry by Jeffrey W. Alexander (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 41 (2) – Jul 30, 2015

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
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Abstract

other tools from the former military factories in the nation.3 During the Korean War, the U.S. military purchased many of its military supplies from Japanese companies. While it may be true that former military engineers had a profound no-war commitment in the immediate postwar period and rejected military-related research and development, it would be helpful to know more about the engineers who contributed to the development of Japan's postwar military industries. As is true of most books, this one includes minor issues and errors. Nishiyama's study uses Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish sources, but neither the endnotes nor the bibliography include translations of the non-English titles, and few of these titles are translated into English within the text. Readers without foreign language skills who wish to have some idea of his sources may be disappointed with the absence of these translations. Factual errors include conversions from acreage to tsubo: 1,429 acres is not 43,220 tsubo, but 1,749,344 tsubo (p. 112); 9.5 acres is not 271 tsubo, but 11,629 tsubo (p. 113); and 14 acres is not 426 tsubo, but 17,138 tsubo (p. 113). In addition, "Prime Minister Yoshida Hitoshi" (p. 111) should be "Prime Minister Yoshida

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2015

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