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Apocalypse in Contemporary Japanese Science Fiction by Motoko Tanaka (review)

Apocalypse in Contemporary Japanese Science Fiction by Motoko Tanaka (review) Review Section across as an empathic ethnographer who took clear delight in her fieldwork and its many opportunities to share and discuss experiences of music. I highly recommend this book to students and scholars of Japanese public culture. It does justice to the quotidian details and expressive magic that contribute to a musical performance. More significantly, I think, it is further proof of how much there is to be learned more generally about Japan when historians and social scientists include and incorporate music as an object of analysis. Apocalypse in Contemporary Japanese Science Fiction. By Motoko Tanaka. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2014. xvi, 189 pages. $90.00, cloth. Reviewed by Michael McCaskey Georgetown University Though the focus of this study, true to its title, is on contemporary Japanese science fiction, Motoko Tanaka begins the book with a valuable diachronic analysis of apocalyptic interpretations of historical events and natural disasters in art and literature in Japan. She considers the influence of the Buddhist concept of mappo, the Last or Latter Dharma Age, which in turn led ¯ to the development of the millenarianist view of life prevalent in much of the literature and art of the Heian period. Tanaka traces http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Apocalypse in Contemporary Japanese Science Fiction by Motoko Tanaka (review)

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review Section across as an empathic ethnographer who took clear delight in her fieldwork and its many opportunities to share and discuss experiences of music. I highly recommend this book to students and scholars of Japanese public culture. It does justice to the quotidian details and expressive magic that contribute to a musical performance. More significantly, I think, it is further proof of how much there is to be learned more generally about Japan when historians and social scientists include and incorporate music as an object of analysis. Apocalypse in Contemporary Japanese Science Fiction. By Motoko Tanaka. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2014. xvi, 189 pages. $90.00, cloth. Reviewed by Michael McCaskey Georgetown University Though the focus of this study, true to its title, is on contemporary Japanese science fiction, Motoko Tanaka begins the book with a valuable diachronic analysis of apocalyptic interpretations of historical events and natural disasters in art and literature in Japan. She considers the influence of the Buddhist concept of mappo, the Last or Latter Dharma Age, which in turn led ¯ to the development of the millenarianist view of life prevalent in much of the literature and art of the Heian period. Tanaka traces

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2015

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