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Acts of Reading: Exploring Connections in Pedagogy of Japanese (review)

Acts of Reading: Exploring Connections in Pedagogy of Japanese (review) veterans of Leyte in 1966, he studied accounts of the battle from both sides and was persuaded that Japanese soldiers had generally fought well even in defeat, though some stragglers ended up as scavengers, thieves, and mur¯ derers. Stahl explains that "Ooka was shocked to learn about this time that bereaved family members were reading Fires on the Plain as a factual record. . . .Having written for ten years about inferior Japanese soldiers who struggled egoistically to survive under abominable front-line conditions . . . , he now felt strongly that it was his solemn moral obligation to correct the record by exposing the whole truth of the Japanese battlefield experience in the Philippines" (p. 214). Applied to both works, Stahl's analysis suggests ¯ that Ooka progressed from "exorcising . . . experiences that haunted him" as a burdened survivor (p. 118) by writing Fires on the Plain (1952) to "`repaying' those who died in [his] place" (p. 215) by "correcting the record" in The Battle for Leyte Island (1967­ 69). ¯ Of course, these burdens and debts weighed more heavily on Ooka because Japanese soldiers fought on the losing side in the Pacific War. Their situation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Acts of Reading: Exploring Connections in Pedagogy of Japanese (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 30 (2) – Jul 30, 2004

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

veterans of Leyte in 1966, he studied accounts of the battle from both sides and was persuaded that Japanese soldiers had generally fought well even in defeat, though some stragglers ended up as scavengers, thieves, and mur¯ derers. Stahl explains that "Ooka was shocked to learn about this time that bereaved family members were reading Fires on the Plain as a factual record. . . .Having written for ten years about inferior Japanese soldiers who struggled egoistically to survive under abominable front-line conditions . . . , he now felt strongly that it was his solemn moral obligation to correct the record by exposing the whole truth of the Japanese battlefield experience in the Philippines" (p. 214). Applied to both works, Stahl's analysis suggests ¯ that Ooka progressed from "exorcising . . . experiences that haunted him" as a burdened survivor (p. 118) by writing Fires on the Plain (1952) to "`repaying' those who died in [his] place" (p. 215) by "correcting the record" in The Battle for Leyte Island (1967­ 69). ¯ Of course, these burdens and debts weighed more heavily on Ooka because Japanese soldiers fought on the losing side in the Pacific War. Their situation

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Jul 30, 2004

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