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Chronic Exposure of Low Power Radio Frequency Changes the EEG Signals of Rats—Low Power Radio Frequency Alters EEG

Chronic Exposure of Low Power Radio Frequency Changes the EEG Signals of Rats—Low Power Radio... Central nervous system of mammals is known to be highly vulnerable to the environmental stimulus, including radio-waves. The aim of this work is to evaluate the chronic effect (one hour daily for 21 days) of low power radio frequency of 1 KHz square wave modulated 2.45 GHz on the electroencephalogram (EEG) in animal model. Experiments were carried out on male rats (n=10), weighing 100(20) gm and age of 9-10 weeks divided in two groups: (i) control (n=4) and (ii) experimental (n=6). After 21 day of experiments, three hours of single channel bipolar EEG signals were recorded from parietal cortex of rats’ brain on 22nd day continuously, under anesthetized condition (Urethane anesthesia: 1.6 gm/kg of body weight, i.p.). The power spectra of the EEG signals were calculated for analysis of changes in EEG frequency spectrum. The core body temperature was also recorded and evaluated for the thermal nature of the exposure. Student t-test was applied to the EEG spectral results as well as on temperature data to analyze the significance of changes. The analyses suggest that this experimental setup of exposure produces non-thermal effects, however, significantly increased (P<0.05 or better) the power of EEG signals. The EEG spectral changes were found most prominent on the higher frequency side. On the basis of results of this study, it can be suggested that the chronic exposure of low power radio frequencies have sufficient energy to change the brain function that may lead to the development of different psychopahological disorders. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Biomedical Engineering Research Science and Engineering Publishing Company

Chronic Exposure of Low Power Radio Frequency Changes the EEG Signals of Rats—Low Power Radio Frequency Alters EEG

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Publisher
Science and Engineering Publishing Company
Copyright
Science and Engineering Publishing Company
ISSN
2328-1731
eISSN
2328-160X

Abstract

Central nervous system of mammals is known to be highly vulnerable to the environmental stimulus, including radio-waves. The aim of this work is to evaluate the chronic effect (one hour daily for 21 days) of low power radio frequency of 1 KHz square wave modulated 2.45 GHz on the electroencephalogram (EEG) in animal model. Experiments were carried out on male rats (n=10), weighing 100(20) gm and age of 9-10 weeks divided in two groups: (i) control (n=4) and (ii) experimental (n=6). After 21 day of experiments, three hours of single channel bipolar EEG signals were recorded from parietal cortex of rats’ brain on 22nd day continuously, under anesthetized condition (Urethane anesthesia: 1.6 gm/kg of body weight, i.p.). The power spectra of the EEG signals were calculated for analysis of changes in EEG frequency spectrum. The core body temperature was also recorded and evaluated for the thermal nature of the exposure. Student t-test was applied to the EEG spectral results as well as on temperature data to analyze the significance of changes. The analyses suggest that this experimental setup of exposure produces non-thermal effects, however, significantly increased (P<0.05 or better) the power of EEG signals. The EEG spectral changes were found most prominent on the higher frequency side. On the basis of results of this study, it can be suggested that the chronic exposure of low power radio frequencies have sufficient energy to change the brain function that may lead to the development of different psychopahological disorders.

Journal

Advances in Biomedical Engineering ResearchScience and Engineering Publishing Company

Published: Jun 1, 2013

Keywords: Chronic Exposure, Electroencephalogram, Low Power Radio Frequency, Rats

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