Women's Voices and Textuality:Chastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing

Women's Voices and Textuality:Chastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing Women's Voices and TextualityChastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing SAGE Publications, Inc.1996DOI: 10.1177/009770049602200402 Anne McLaren La Trobe University My God, had women written histories Like cloistered scholars in oratories They'd have set down more of men's wickedness Than all the sons of Adam could redress. Chaucer, "Wife of Bath," Canterbury Tales For scholars of the past, the milieu and beliefs of the illiterate appear to lie in a vast subterranean vault beneath a mountain of written records transmitted over the centuries. Sometimes, a male writer such as Chaucer will imaginatively reconstruct the words of a woman (as in the Wife of Bath above). For the premodern period it is much rarer, however, to come across the direct transmission in writing of the emotional outpourings of unlearned women. The discovery of the writings of peasant women of Jiangyong county in Hunan in a unique script that they called "women's writing," or niishu, offers an unri- valed opportunity to examine the cultural lore transmitted by a community of women who continued to live a traditional way of life well into the twentieth century. Chinese women in Jiangyong county taught each other how to read and write in a phonetic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modern China SAGE

Women's Voices and Textuality:Chastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing

Modern China , Volume 22 (4): 382 – Oct 1, 1996
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Women's Voices and Textuality:Chastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing

Abstract

Women's Voices and TextualityChastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing SAGE Publications, Inc.1996DOI: 10.1177/009770049602200402 Anne McLaren La Trobe University My God, had women written histories Like cloistered scholars in oratories They'd have set down more of men's wickedness Than all the sons of Adam could redress. Chaucer, "Wife of Bath," Canterbury Tales For scholars of the past, the milieu and beliefs of the illiterate appear to lie in a vast subterranean vault beneath a mountain of written records transmitted over the centuries. Sometimes, a male writer such as Chaucer will imaginatively reconstruct the words of a woman (as in the Wife of Bath above). For the premodern period it is much rarer, however, to come across the direct transmission in writing of the emotional outpourings of unlearned women. The discovery of the writings of peasant women of Jiangyong county in Hunan in a unique script that they called "women's writing," or niishu, offers an unri- valed opportunity to examine the cultural lore transmitted by a community of women who continued to live a traditional way of life well into the twentieth century. Chinese women in Jiangyong county taught each other how to read and write in a phonetic
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Publisher
Sage Publications
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0097-7004
eISSN
0097-7004
D.O.I.
10.1177/009770049602200402
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Women's Voices and TextualityChastity and Abduction in Chinese Nüshu Writing SAGE Publications, Inc.1996DOI: 10.1177/009770049602200402 Anne McLaren La Trobe University My God, had women written histories Like cloistered scholars in oratories They'd have set down more of men's wickedness Than all the sons of Adam could redress. Chaucer, "Wife of Bath," Canterbury Tales For scholars of the past, the milieu and beliefs of the illiterate appear to lie in a vast subterranean vault beneath a mountain of written records transmitted over the centuries. Sometimes, a male writer such as Chaucer will imaginatively reconstruct the words of a woman (as in the Wife of Bath above). For the premodern period it is much rarer, however, to come across the direct transmission in writing of the emotional outpourings of unlearned women. The discovery of the writings of peasant women of Jiangyong county in Hunan in a unique script that they called "women's writing," or niishu, offers an unri- valed opportunity to examine the cultural lore transmitted by a community of women who continued to live a traditional way of life well into the twentieth century. Chinese women in Jiangyong county taught each other how to read and write in a phonetic

Journal

Modern ChinaSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 1996

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