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Where There's Smoke There's Fire: Outdoor Smoking Bans and Claims to Public Space

Where There's Smoke There's Fire: Outdoor Smoking Bans and Claims to Public Space The Canadian city of Vancouver was very early to introduce extensive smokefree legislation. Smoking has been banned in all indoor locations for well over a decade and tobacco control advocates have also recently begun to push for the expansion of such legislation into outdoor spaces in the city. Drawing on a 6-month period of observation of smokers and “not-smokers” on their lunch breaks at office sites in downtown Vancouver, I examine the ways that smokers engage with outdoor public space. I show that while smokers continue to make material claims to such space, these claims have become increasingly tenuous. I argue that tobacco “denormalization” strategies provide essential context for understanding outdoor smoking bans and raise ethical questions about the form of de-facto prohibition they appear to encourage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Drug Problems SAGE

Where There's Smoke There's Fire: Outdoor Smoking Bans and Claims to Public Space

Contemporary Drug Problems , Volume 40 (1): 30 – Mar 1, 2013

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2013 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0091-4509
eISSN
2163-1808
DOI
10.1177/009145091304000106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Canadian city of Vancouver was very early to introduce extensive smokefree legislation. Smoking has been banned in all indoor locations for well over a decade and tobacco control advocates have also recently begun to push for the expansion of such legislation into outdoor spaces in the city. Drawing on a 6-month period of observation of smokers and “not-smokers” on their lunch breaks at office sites in downtown Vancouver, I examine the ways that smokers engage with outdoor public space. I show that while smokers continue to make material claims to such space, these claims have become increasingly tenuous. I argue that tobacco “denormalization” strategies provide essential context for understanding outdoor smoking bans and raise ethical questions about the form of de-facto prohibition they appear to encourage.

Journal

Contemporary Drug ProblemsSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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