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What We Know about the Strategic Management of Technology

What We Know about the Strategic Management of Technology O'l'I\ll\\ What We Know about the Strategic Management of Technology Keith Pavitt n high wage countries, both the competitiveness of firms and more general welfare depend critically on the ability to keep up Iin innovative products and processes and in the underlying technologies. Recent statistical studiesshow that the levels of com­ panies' investments in technology explain international differences in productivity and in shares of world markets. I In the increasingly turbulent, uncertain, and competitive world since 1973, the rate of growth of business funded R&D activities in the OECD area has actually increased.' In sectors like electronics, aircraft, and fine chemicals, companies' expenditures on R&D are greater than their investments in fixed equipment and plant. In the UK, it has been recognized for some time that in spite of improve­ ments in certain aspects of economic performance, national technological activities and international competitiveness remain unsatisfactory in many sectors. Similar concerns about technological competitiveness have spread to other countries as a consequence of the dynamism of Japanese firms. These concerns have been particularly marked in the United States, where sectors of earlier technological strength-steel, automobiles, and now electronics-are under threat from Japanese firms that spend about 30 per cent more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png California Management Review SAGE

What We Know about the Strategic Management of Technology

California Management Review , Volume 32 (3): 10 – Apr 1, 1990

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References (26)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1990 The Regents of the University of California
ISSN
0008-1256
eISSN
2162-8564
DOI
10.2307/41166614
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

O'l'I\ll\\ What We Know about the Strategic Management of Technology Keith Pavitt n high wage countries, both the competitiveness of firms and more general welfare depend critically on the ability to keep up Iin innovative products and processes and in the underlying technologies. Recent statistical studiesshow that the levels of com­ panies' investments in technology explain international differences in productivity and in shares of world markets. I In the increasingly turbulent, uncertain, and competitive world since 1973, the rate of growth of business funded R&D activities in the OECD area has actually increased.' In sectors like electronics, aircraft, and fine chemicals, companies' expenditures on R&D are greater than their investments in fixed equipment and plant. In the UK, it has been recognized for some time that in spite of improve­ ments in certain aspects of economic performance, national technological activities and international competitiveness remain unsatisfactory in many sectors. Similar concerns about technological competitiveness have spread to other countries as a consequence of the dynamism of Japanese firms. These concerns have been particularly marked in the United States, where sectors of earlier technological strength-steel, automobiles, and now electronics-are under threat from Japanese firms that spend about 30 per cent more

Journal

California Management ReviewSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1990

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