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What Is Racial Residential Integration? A Research Synthesis, 1950–2013

What Is Racial Residential Integration? A Research Synthesis, 1950–2013 In the past two decades, there has been a sharp increase in the number of studies on racial residential integration. However, there is a fair amount of disagreement in this work about how to conceptualize integration and how to operationalize it in research. We conduct a research synthesis of published research from 1950 to 2013 to uncover (1) how scholars have defined integration, (2) how scholars have measured integration, and (3) which ethnic/racial groups are integrating with whom. We have three key findings. First, the definition of integration moved away from being a multidimensional concept—involving both racial mixing in neighborhoods and cross-racial interactions—to solely referring to the racial composition. Second, the measurement of integration varies tremendously across time. Third, although the combination of ethnic/racial groups has expanded from Whites and Blacks sharing a residential space to include other groups such as Asians and Hispanics, these differences are often not made explicit. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology of Race and Ethnicity SAGE

What Is Racial Residential Integration? A Research Synthesis, 1950–2013

Sociology of Race and Ethnicity , Volume 1 (4): 8 – Oct 1, 2015

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© American Sociological Association 2015
ISSN
2332-6492
eISSN
2332-6506
DOI
10.1177/2332649215598159
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the past two decades, there has been a sharp increase in the number of studies on racial residential integration. However, there is a fair amount of disagreement in this work about how to conceptualize integration and how to operationalize it in research. We conduct a research synthesis of published research from 1950 to 2013 to uncover (1) how scholars have defined integration, (2) how scholars have measured integration, and (3) which ethnic/racial groups are integrating with whom. We have three key findings. First, the definition of integration moved away from being a multidimensional concept—involving both racial mixing in neighborhoods and cross-racial interactions—to solely referring to the racial composition. Second, the measurement of integration varies tremendously across time. Third, although the combination of ethnic/racial groups has expanded from Whites and Blacks sharing a residential space to include other groups such as Asians and Hispanics, these differences are often not made explicit. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings.

Journal

Sociology of Race and EthnicitySAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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