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“We Count What Matters”: Students’ Color-Blind “Merit-Based” Logic and the Reproduction of Inequality in a College Admissions Activity

“We Count What Matters”: Students’ Color-Blind “Merit-Based” Logic and the Reproduction of... The authors introduce a college admissions simulation activity that facilitates discussions of affirmative action and racial disparities in the seemingly objective college admissions process. In this activity, students serve as mock admissions committees in small groups. On the basis of activity sheets collected from multiple courses across several institutions, the authors disclose quantitative patterns in students’ applicant choices and qualitative themes reflecting students’ decision making processes. The authors discuss how this activity and subsequent class discussion help students to recognize and think through meritocratic assumptions and color-blind practices that reproduce racial inequality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology of Race and Ethnicity SAGE

“We Count What Matters”: Students’ Color-Blind “Merit-Based” Logic and the Reproduction of Inequality in a College Admissions Activity

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© American Sociological Association 2019
ISSN
2332-6492
eISSN
2332-6506
DOI
10.1177/2332649219850198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors introduce a college admissions simulation activity that facilitates discussions of affirmative action and racial disparities in the seemingly objective college admissions process. In this activity, students serve as mock admissions committees in small groups. On the basis of activity sheets collected from multiple courses across several institutions, the authors disclose quantitative patterns in students’ applicant choices and qualitative themes reflecting students’ decision making processes. The authors discuss how this activity and subsequent class discussion help students to recognize and think through meritocratic assumptions and color-blind practices that reproduce racial inequality.

Journal

Sociology of Race and EthnicitySAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2019

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