Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6

Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6 Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6 SAGE Publications, Inc.1981DOI: 10.1177/001452468109201204 Wayne H.Hagen THE sixth chapter of Paul's letter to the Romans presents the interpreter with the emphatic statement that the believer is 'dead to sin' (w. 2, 11), 'has been set free from sin' (vv. 18, 22) and the equally emphatic command to resist sin (w. 13, 19). Attempts to overcome this contradiction, to show that it is not a contradiction, are often ingenious and uplifting but are not necessarily the best solution to the problem. It is typically assumed that Romans 6, in its entirety, originated with Paul and that the conflict between the indicative and the imperative is integral to Paul's thought. This assumption should be questioned and it is the thesis of this study that two verses, 13 and 19, did not originate with Paul but were interpolated into the text by a later editor. It is apparent that we do not possess the original letter to the Romans. We have access to the letter only as it appeared in a collection of Paul's letters and other writings prepared for use in the church in the second, third and fourth centuries. There exists, therefore the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Expository Times SAGE

Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6

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Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6

Abstract

Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6 SAGE Publications, Inc.1981DOI: 10.1177/001452468109201204 Wayne H.Hagen THE sixth chapter of Paul's letter to the Romans presents the interpreter with the emphatic statement that the believer is 'dead to sin' (w. 2, 11), 'has been set free from sin' (vv. 18, 22) and the equally emphatic command to resist sin (w. 13, 19). Attempts to overcome this contradiction, to show that it is not a contradiction, are often ingenious and uplifting but are not necessarily the best solution to the problem. It is typically assumed that Romans 6, in its entirety, originated with Paul and that the conflict between the indicative and the imperative is integral to Paul's thought. This assumption should be questioned and it is the thesis of this study that two verses, 13 and 19, did not originate with Paul but were interpolated into the text by a later editor. It is apparent that we do not possess the original letter to the Romans. We have access to the letter only as it appeared in a collection of Paul's letters and other writings prepared for use in the church in the second, third and fourth centuries. There exists, therefore the
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Publisher
Sage Publications
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0014-5246
eISSN
0014-5246
D.O.I.
10.1177/001452468109201204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two Deutero-Pauline Glosses in Romans 6 SAGE Publications, Inc.1981DOI: 10.1177/001452468109201204 Wayne H.Hagen THE sixth chapter of Paul's letter to the Romans presents the interpreter with the emphatic statement that the believer is 'dead to sin' (w. 2, 11), 'has been set free from sin' (vv. 18, 22) and the equally emphatic command to resist sin (w. 13, 19). Attempts to overcome this contradiction, to show that it is not a contradiction, are often ingenious and uplifting but are not necessarily the best solution to the problem. It is typically assumed that Romans 6, in its entirety, originated with Paul and that the conflict between the indicative and the imperative is integral to Paul's thought. This assumption should be questioned and it is the thesis of this study that two verses, 13 and 19, did not originate with Paul but were interpolated into the text by a later editor. It is apparent that we do not possess the original letter to the Romans. We have access to the letter only as it appeared in a collection of Paul's letters and other writings prepared for use in the church in the second, third and fourth centuries. There exists, therefore the

Journal

The Expository TimesSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1981

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