Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility

Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility PurposeTransverse sinus stenosis is commonly seen in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It is not clear whether it is the cause or the result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension has been carried out in several prior series. Our goal was to evaluate the clinical and imaging follow-up results of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension that underwent stenting for this condition at our center.Materials and MethodsWe reviewed the clinical, venographic and follow-up imaging data in patients who underwent elective transverse sinus stenting during the period from 2011 to 2017.ResultsIn total, 18 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were identified. The mean lumbar cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure recorded was 408 mmH20. Overall, 16 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent transverse sinus stenting. At venography, the mean pressure gradient across the dominant transverse sinus stenosis was 21 mmHg. The pressure gradient immediately after stenting in all of those measured was negligible. Following stenting, headaches improved in 10 of the 16 cases, with persistent headaches in four patients, one of which had persistent baseline migraines. All cases showed resolution of the papilledema on follow up. Follow-up imaging with computed tomography venography showed that the stents remained widely patent. The follow up in clinic was done for a mean period of 35.5 months. Follow up with computed tomography venography was done for a mean of 10.3 months.ConclusionVenous sinus stenting is a safe and effective procedure. It relieves papilledema in all cases and improves headaches in most cases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Neuroradiology Journal SAGE

Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1971-4009
eISSN
2385-1996
D.O.I.
10.1177/1971400918782320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeTransverse sinus stenosis is commonly seen in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It is not clear whether it is the cause or the result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension has been carried out in several prior series. Our goal was to evaluate the clinical and imaging follow-up results of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension that underwent stenting for this condition at our center.Materials and MethodsWe reviewed the clinical, venographic and follow-up imaging data in patients who underwent elective transverse sinus stenting during the period from 2011 to 2017.ResultsIn total, 18 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were identified. The mean lumbar cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure recorded was 408 mmH20. Overall, 16 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent transverse sinus stenting. At venography, the mean pressure gradient across the dominant transverse sinus stenosis was 21 mmHg. The pressure gradient immediately after stenting in all of those measured was negligible. Following stenting, headaches improved in 10 of the 16 cases, with persistent headaches in four patients, one of which had persistent baseline migraines. All cases showed resolution of the papilledema on follow up. Follow-up imaging with computed tomography venography showed that the stents remained widely patent. The follow up in clinic was done for a mean period of 35.5 months. Follow up with computed tomography venography was done for a mean of 10.3 months.ConclusionVenous sinus stenting is a safe and effective procedure. It relieves papilledema in all cases and improves headaches in most cases.

Journal

The Neuroradiology JournalSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2018

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