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‘The Quiet Revolution’?

‘The Quiet Revolution’? Research Note WES42776 Forrester 20/6/04 3:53 pm Page 413 Work, employment and society Copyright © 2004 BSA Publications Ltd® Volume 18(2): 413–420 [DOI: 10.1177/09500172004042776] SAGE Publications London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi ‘The quiet revolution’? trade union learning and renewal strategies Keith Forrester University of Leeds, UK or unions in general and the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in particular, the promotion of learning opportunities for their members has emerged as F a recent and important success story. Developing the learning careers of trade unionists is cited as an illustration of ‘the modern role for unions’ and rep- resents an ‘ambitious and innovative agenda’ for future activity (TUC, 1998b). Regional networks of TUC Learning Advisors have been established and simi- lar networks of Learning Organizers are currently being developed within large unions such as Amicus, Unison and the Transport and General Workers Union. Considerable financial support from the Department of Education and Skills (DfES) through the Union Learning Funds (ULFs) project, together with finan- cial grants from Learning and Skills Councils, today provides a vital component to the good financial position of the organization (TUC, 2001: 152). As indi- cated at the 2002 Annual ULF conference, ‘over the last five years, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Work, Employment and Society SAGE

‘The Quiet Revolution’?

Work, Employment and Society , Volume 18 (2): 8 – Jun 1, 2004

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References (25)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0950-0170
eISSN
1469-8722
DOI
10.1177/09500172004042776
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research Note WES42776 Forrester 20/6/04 3:53 pm Page 413 Work, employment and society Copyright © 2004 BSA Publications Ltd® Volume 18(2): 413–420 [DOI: 10.1177/09500172004042776] SAGE Publications London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi ‘The quiet revolution’? trade union learning and renewal strategies Keith Forrester University of Leeds, UK or unions in general and the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in particular, the promotion of learning opportunities for their members has emerged as F a recent and important success story. Developing the learning careers of trade unionists is cited as an illustration of ‘the modern role for unions’ and rep- resents an ‘ambitious and innovative agenda’ for future activity (TUC, 1998b). Regional networks of TUC Learning Advisors have been established and simi- lar networks of Learning Organizers are currently being developed within large unions such as Amicus, Unison and the Transport and General Workers Union. Considerable financial support from the Department of Education and Skills (DfES) through the Union Learning Funds (ULFs) project, together with finan- cial grants from Learning and Skills Councils, today provides a vital component to the good financial position of the organization (TUC, 2001: 152). As indi- cated at the 2002 Annual ULF conference, ‘over the last five years,

Journal

Work, Employment and SocietySAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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