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The Paradoxes of Teaching a Multicultural Education Course Online

The Paradoxes of Teaching a Multicultural Education Course Online The author shares her pedagogy in taking a conventional, campus-based graduate course, transforming it for asynchronous learning and teaching it over the World Wide Web. Some paradoxes resulted as the course changed from face-to-face to online interaction. First, the teachers were more open, frank, expansive, curious, even confessional in their willingness to share and discuss prickly issues such as White privilege, racism, educational inequities, injustice, and xenophobia than teachers have been in the campus version of the course. Second, the interaction patterns online were more equitable and cross-cultural than those in the campus version. However, many teachers questioned whether the course’s reliance on electronic technologies prevented them from “knowing the other.” Some perceived that they had to physically interact with people face to face to develop relationships across cultures—relationships that some teachers said were prerequisite to their rethinking how their own teaching could better support diversity and social justice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Teacher Education: The Journal of Policy, Practice, and Research in Teacher Education SAGE

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References (71)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0022-4871
eISSN
1552-7816
DOI
10.1177/0022487101052004003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The author shares her pedagogy in taking a conventional, campus-based graduate course, transforming it for asynchronous learning and teaching it over the World Wide Web. Some paradoxes resulted as the course changed from face-to-face to online interaction. First, the teachers were more open, frank, expansive, curious, even confessional in their willingness to share and discuss prickly issues such as White privilege, racism, educational inequities, injustice, and xenophobia than teachers have been in the campus version of the course. Second, the interaction patterns online were more equitable and cross-cultural than those in the campus version. However, many teachers questioned whether the course’s reliance on electronic technologies prevented them from “knowing the other.” Some perceived that they had to physically interact with people face to face to develop relationships across cultures—relationships that some teachers said were prerequisite to their rethinking how their own teaching could better support diversity and social justice.

Journal

Journal of Teacher Education: The Journal of Policy, Practice, and Research in Teacher EducationSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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