The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45

The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45 The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45 SAGE Publications, Inc.1994DOI: 10.1177/002200949402900402 Doris L. Bergen Hitler himself supposedly coined the definition of 'Volksdeutsche' that appeared in a 1938 memorandum of the German Reich Chancellery. The Volksdeutsche, that document rather blandly explained, were people whose 'language and culture had German origins' but who did not hold German citizenship. But for Hitler and other Germans of the 1930s and 1940s, the term 'Volksdeutsche' also carried overtones of blood and race not captured in the English translation 'ethnic Germans'. According to German experts in the 1930s, about thirty million Volksdeutsche were living outside the Reich, a significant proportion of them in eastern Europe - Poland, Ukraine, the Baltic states, Romania.2 The nazi goal of expansion to the east ensured that Volksdeutsche in those areas occupied a special place in German plans. Memoir literature attests to the fact that some of the Volksdeutsche in eastern Europe contributed far more than silent acquiescence to the betrayal and murder of their Jewish neighbours during the Holocaust.3 Individual ethnic Germans stole Jewish property, participated in nazi-sponsored pogroms, and turned in Jews who tried to pass as Aryans. In more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Contemporary History SAGE

The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45

Preview Only

The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45

Abstract

The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45 SAGE Publications, Inc.1994DOI: 10.1177/002200949402900402 Doris L. Bergen Hitler himself supposedly coined the definition of 'Volksdeutsche' that appeared in a 1938 memorandum of the German Reich Chancellery. The Volksdeutsche, that document rather blandly explained, were people whose 'language and culture had German origins' but who did not hold German citizenship. But for Hitler and other Germans of the 1930s and 1940s, the term 'Volksdeutsche' also carried overtones of blood and race not captured in the English translation 'ethnic Germans'. According to German experts in the 1930s, about thirty million Volksdeutsche were living outside the Reich, a significant proportion of them in eastern Europe - Poland, Ukraine, the Baltic states, Romania.2 The nazi goal of expansion to the east ensured that Volksdeutsche in those areas occupied a special place in German plans. Memoir literature attests to the fact that some of the Volksdeutsche in eastern Europe contributed far more than silent acquiescence to the betrayal and murder of their Jewish neighbours during the Holocaust.3 Individual ethnic Germans stole Jewish property, participated in nazi-sponsored pogroms, and turned in Jews who tried to pass as Aryans. In more
Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/the-nazi-concept-of-volksdeutsche-and-the-exacerbation-of-anti-AM60h08D5M
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0022-0094
eISSN
0022-0094
D.O.I.
10.1177/002200949402900402
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Nazi Concept of 'Volksdeutsche' and the Exacerbation of Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, 1939-45 SAGE Publications, Inc.1994DOI: 10.1177/002200949402900402 Doris L. Bergen Hitler himself supposedly coined the definition of 'Volksdeutsche' that appeared in a 1938 memorandum of the German Reich Chancellery. The Volksdeutsche, that document rather blandly explained, were people whose 'language and culture had German origins' but who did not hold German citizenship. But for Hitler and other Germans of the 1930s and 1940s, the term 'Volksdeutsche' also carried overtones of blood and race not captured in the English translation 'ethnic Germans'. According to German experts in the 1930s, about thirty million Volksdeutsche were living outside the Reich, a significant proportion of them in eastern Europe - Poland, Ukraine, the Baltic states, Romania.2 The nazi goal of expansion to the east ensured that Volksdeutsche in those areas occupied a special place in German plans. Memoir literature attests to the fact that some of the Volksdeutsche in eastern Europe contributed far more than silent acquiescence to the betrayal and murder of their Jewish neighbours during the Holocaust.3 Individual ethnic Germans stole Jewish property, participated in nazi-sponsored pogroms, and turned in Jews who tried to pass as Aryans. In more

Journal

Journal of Contemporary HistorySAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off