Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The emergence and evolution of an external actor’s regional role: An interactionist role theory perspective

The emergence and evolution of an external actor’s regional role: An interactionist role theory... The regional roles external actors play, such as ‘China’s role in Africa’ or ‘the US role in East Asia’, have long been popular subjects of analysis in the international relations literature. Yet, the emergence and evolution of these roles remains remarkably under-theorized. While some ‘new regionalist’ scholars have discussed the dynamics of an external actor’s regional involvement by referring to the concepts of ‘penetration’ and ‘socialization’, neither concept, this article argues, is sufficiently equipped to capture how external actors come to aspire and realize their regional roles. To address this shortcoming, the article employs an interactionist role theory perspective, which draws on the work of social psychologist George Herbert Mead. In following this perspective, the article argues that external actors develop regional role aspirations as they draw on their creativity and reflexivity to overcome experienced uncertainties. To realize these aspirations, the article suggests, external actors seek to cast significant others into corresponding roles. Alter-casting, the article argues in this context, is critical for understanding the (re)constitution of an external actor’s regional role, and thus a region’s social structure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cooperation and Conflict SAGE

The emergence and evolution of an external actor’s regional role: An interactionist role theory perspective

Cooperation and Conflict , Volume 54 (3): 16 – Sep 1, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/the-emergence-and-evolution-of-an-external-actor-s-regional-role-an-PBDy48WDu0
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
0010-8367
eISSN
1460-3691
DOI
10.1177/0010836718774584
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The regional roles external actors play, such as ‘China’s role in Africa’ or ‘the US role in East Asia’, have long been popular subjects of analysis in the international relations literature. Yet, the emergence and evolution of these roles remains remarkably under-theorized. While some ‘new regionalist’ scholars have discussed the dynamics of an external actor’s regional involvement by referring to the concepts of ‘penetration’ and ‘socialization’, neither concept, this article argues, is sufficiently equipped to capture how external actors come to aspire and realize their regional roles. To address this shortcoming, the article employs an interactionist role theory perspective, which draws on the work of social psychologist George Herbert Mead. In following this perspective, the article argues that external actors develop regional role aspirations as they draw on their creativity and reflexivity to overcome experienced uncertainties. To realize these aspirations, the article suggests, external actors seek to cast significant others into corresponding roles. Alter-casting, the article argues in this context, is critical for understanding the (re)constitution of an external actor’s regional role, and thus a region’s social structure.

Journal

Cooperation and ConflictSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2019

There are no references for this article.