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The Deindustrialization of India in the Nineteenth Century: A Methodological Critique of Amiya Kumar Bagchi

The Deindustrialization of India in the Nineteenth Century: A Methodological Critique of Amiya Kumar Bagchi SAGE Publications, Inc.1979DOI: 10.1177/001946467901600201 Marika Vicziany University of Melbourne This paper questions the conclusions reached by A.K. Bagchi on the deindustrialization of India in the nineteenth century. Reference is made to two articles which Bagchi has written on the subject: one appeared in The Journal of Development Studies in January 1976 and the other in Essaps in Honour of Professor Susobhan Charrdra Sarkar ( 1976).1 To obtain the full benefit of Bagchi's arguments the ~wo articles need to be treated together, especially because the first places his study in a broader theoretical context and presumably appeals to a wider audience and the second is somewhat more explicit about the methods which Bagchi used in deriving his results. Bagchi's study rested upon one specific definition of deindustrialization: the decline, over a given time period, in the proportion of population dependent on secondary industry.2 2 Bagchi concluded that "The 'naive' idea current *For their comments and criticisms I thank Professor S. Ambirajan, Dr R. Bingle, Professor B. Cohn, Dr J. Krishnamurty, Professor Morris D. Morris, Stewart Rosewsrne, Kelvin Rowley and Dr A. Thomson. An earlier http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Indian Economic & Social History Review SAGE

The Deindustrialization of India in the Nineteenth Century: A Methodological Critique of Amiya Kumar Bagchi

Abstract

The Deindustrialization of India in the Nineteenth Century: A Methodological Critique of Amiya Kumar Bagchi SAGE Publications, Inc.1979DOI: 10.1177/001946467901600201 Marika Vicziany University of Melbourne This paper questions the conclusions reached by A.K. Bagchi on the deindustrialization of India in the nineteenth century. Reference is made to two articles which Bagchi has written on the subject: one appeared in The Journal of Development Studies in January 1976 and the other in Essaps in Honour of Professor Susobhan Charrdra Sarkar ( 1976).1 To obtain the full benefit of Bagchi's arguments the ~wo articles need to be treated together, especially because the first places his study in a broader theoretical context and presumably appeals to a wider audience and the second is somewhat more explicit about the methods which Bagchi used in deriving his results. Bagchi's study rested upon one specific definition of deindustrialization: the decline, over a given time period, in the proportion of population dependent on secondary industry.2 2 Bagchi concluded that "The 'naive' idea current *For their comments and criticisms I thank Professor S. Ambirajan, Dr R. Bingle, Professor B. Cohn, Dr J. Krishnamurty, Professor Morris D. Morris, Stewart Rosewsrne, Kelvin Rowley and Dr A. Thomson. An earlier
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