The clinical potential of romosozumab for the prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

The clinical potential of romosozumab for the prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women... The glycoprotein sclerostin inhibits activation of the canonical Wnt pathway and thereby suppresses bone formation by inhibiting the osteoblasts. Additionally, sclerostin increases bone resorption by stimulating the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-β-ligand (RANKL). Romosozumab (ROMO) is a monoclonal antibody against sclerostin. Phase III clinical trials in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis have shown that ROMO increases bone mineral density at the lumbar spine and hip and reduces the risk of vertebral and clinical fractures in comparison with placebo. In women with severe osteoporosis, ROMO reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral and clinical fractures in comparison with alendronate. ROMO is the first treatment for osteoporosis with dual action, and may become a valuable tool for improving the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, the approval of ROMO by the authorities is awaiting further investigations of a potential increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with ROMO treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease SAGE

The clinical potential of romosozumab for the prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2018
ISSN
1759-720X
eISSN
1759-7218
D.O.I.
10.1177/1759720X18775936
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The glycoprotein sclerostin inhibits activation of the canonical Wnt pathway and thereby suppresses bone formation by inhibiting the osteoblasts. Additionally, sclerostin increases bone resorption by stimulating the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-β-ligand (RANKL). Romosozumab (ROMO) is a monoclonal antibody against sclerostin. Phase III clinical trials in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis have shown that ROMO increases bone mineral density at the lumbar spine and hip and reduces the risk of vertebral and clinical fractures in comparison with placebo. In women with severe osteoporosis, ROMO reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral and clinical fractures in comparison with alendronate. ROMO is the first treatment for osteoporosis with dual action, and may become a valuable tool for improving the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, the approval of ROMO by the authorities is awaiting further investigations of a potential increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with ROMO treatment.

Journal

Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal DiseaseSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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