The central locus of self-prioritisation

The central locus of self-prioritisation Self-related information is under many circumstances processed in a preferred and biasedway, leading to what has been termed the self-prioritisation effect (SPE). The SPE hasbeen demonstrated with arbitrary stimuli assigned to self and others, thereby controllingthe influence of familiarity, and originally been attributed to facilitated perceptualprocessing of self-related stimuli. Subsequent studies, however, casted doubts on thisinterpretation and suggested further possible sources for the SPE. In the present fourexperiments, we used the well-established psychological refractory period paradigmtogether with the locus of slack and the effect propagation logic to pinpoint the sourceof the SPE. The data consistently demonstrated the SPE across all experiments. Moreimportant, the results converge on the notion that the SPE has its source in acapacity-limited stage of central processing. The implications of these results arediscussed in light of possible candidate processes as sources for the SPE, such asmemory-related processing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology SAGE

The central locus of self-prioritisation

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© Experimental Psychology Society 2018
ISSN
1747-0218
eISSN
1747-0226
D.O.I.
10.1177/1747021818778970
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Self-related information is under many circumstances processed in a preferred and biasedway, leading to what has been termed the self-prioritisation effect (SPE). The SPE hasbeen demonstrated with arbitrary stimuli assigned to self and others, thereby controllingthe influence of familiarity, and originally been attributed to facilitated perceptualprocessing of self-related stimuli. Subsequent studies, however, casted doubts on thisinterpretation and suggested further possible sources for the SPE. In the present fourexperiments, we used the well-established psychological refractory period paradigmtogether with the locus of slack and the effect propagation logic to pinpoint the sourceof the SPE. The data consistently demonstrated the SPE across all experiments. Moreimportant, the results converge on the notion that the SPE has its source in acapacity-limited stage of central processing. The implications of these results arediscussed in light of possible candidate processes as sources for the SPE, such asmemory-related processing.

Journal

Quarterly Journal of Experimental PsychologySAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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