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South Africa’s hybrid care regime: The changing and contested roles of individuals, families and the state after apartheid

South Africa’s hybrid care regime: The changing and contested roles of individuals, families and... The post-apartheid state in South Africa inherited a care regime that historically combined liberal, social democratic and conservative features. The post-apartheid state has sought to deracialise the care regime, through extending to the African majority the privileges that hitherto had been largely confined to the white minority, and to transform it, to render it more appropriate to the needs and norms of the African majority. Deracialisation proved insufficient and transformation too limited to address inequalities in access to care. Reform also generated tensions, including between a predominant ideology that accords women and children rights as autonomous individuals, the widespread belief in kinship obligations and an enduring if less widespread conservative, patriarchal ideology. Ordinary people must navigate between the market (if they can afford it), the state and the family, balancing opportunities for independence with the claims made on and by kin. The care regime thus remains a contested hybrid. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sociology SAGE

South Africa’s hybrid care regime: The changing and contested roles of individuals, families and the state after apartheid

Current Sociology , Volume 66 (4): 15 – Jul 1, 2018

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References (87)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
0011-3921
eISSN
1461-7064
DOI
10.1177/0011392118765243
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The post-apartheid state in South Africa inherited a care regime that historically combined liberal, social democratic and conservative features. The post-apartheid state has sought to deracialise the care regime, through extending to the African majority the privileges that hitherto had been largely confined to the white minority, and to transform it, to render it more appropriate to the needs and norms of the African majority. Deracialisation proved insufficient and transformation too limited to address inequalities in access to care. Reform also generated tensions, including between a predominant ideology that accords women and children rights as autonomous individuals, the widespread belief in kinship obligations and an enduring if less widespread conservative, patriarchal ideology. Ordinary people must navigate between the market (if they can afford it), the state and the family, balancing opportunities for independence with the claims made on and by kin. The care regime thus remains a contested hybrid.

Journal

Current SociologySAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2018

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