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Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry

Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry Our research tracks the location of musicians and music establishments in U.S. regions from 1970 to 2004. We find that the music industry has become significantly more concentrated over time. New York and Los Angeles remain dominant locations, with Nashville emerging as a third major center. This reflects the economic and artistic advantages of large markets. We also find evidence of the persistence of musicians and music scenes in some smaller locations throughout the United States. This reflects demand for music in some small locations with more affluent, higher-human capital populations, location-specific assets, and technological changes that have lowered the costs for producing, distributing, and consuming music across locations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Planning Education and Research SAGE

Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry

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References (63)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2010 Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning
ISSN
0739-456X
eISSN
1552-6577
DOI
10.1177/0739456X09354453
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Our research tracks the location of musicians and music establishments in U.S. regions from 1970 to 2004. We find that the music industry has become significantly more concentrated over time. New York and Los Angeles remain dominant locations, with Nashville emerging as a third major center. This reflects the economic and artistic advantages of large markets. We also find evidence of the persistence of musicians and music scenes in some smaller locations throughout the United States. This reflects demand for music in some small locations with more affluent, higher-human capital populations, location-specific assets, and technological changes that have lowered the costs for producing, distributing, and consuming music across locations.

Journal

Journal of Planning Education and ResearchSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2010

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