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Social Support, Home/Work Stress, and Burnout: Who can Help?

Social Support, Home/Work Stress, and Burnout: Who can Help? This study considered the nature of home/work stress and investigated the role of social support from both intra- and extraorganizational sources in reducing that stress and buffering its impact on burnout. Specifically, demographic factors affecting perceptions of home/work stress and the impact of various sources of social support were examined. Data were collected from nursing-home nurses and analyzed using regression techniques. Results suggested that participants with children and those cohabiting with their partners were particularly vulnerable to home/work stress. Results also indicated that different sources of social support worked in unique ways to relieve the strain of home/work stress. Implications of this research for theory on social support are considered, along with the pragmatic suggestions for using study results in dealing with home/work stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science: A Publication of the NTL Institute SAGE

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References (49)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0021-8863
eISSN
1552-6879
DOI
10.1177/0021886394303007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study considered the nature of home/work stress and investigated the role of social support from both intra- and extraorganizational sources in reducing that stress and buffering its impact on burnout. Specifically, demographic factors affecting perceptions of home/work stress and the impact of various sources of social support were examined. Data were collected from nursing-home nurses and analyzed using regression techniques. Results suggested that participants with children and those cohabiting with their partners were particularly vulnerable to home/work stress. Results also indicated that different sources of social support worked in unique ways to relieve the strain of home/work stress. Implications of this research for theory on social support are considered, along with the pragmatic suggestions for using study results in dealing with home/work stress.

Journal

The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science: A Publication of the NTL InstituteSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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