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Self-Differentiation and Well-Being in a Life Transition

Self-Differentiation and Well-Being in a Life Transition Previous research has shown that evaluative organization of self-knowledge explains variance in self-esteem and mood beyond that accounted for by positive or negative content. Here, that model is applied to the changing self perceptions of women in a life transition. In a sample of 120 older women who had relocated within the past year, evaluative differentiation of self-change—the tendency to perceive self-change very positively in some domains and very negatively in others—was associated with greater well-being among women whose positive domains were perceived to be important. People who perceive great improvement in at least one important domain of the self (despite sacrifice in others) may be more resilient during a life transition than those who experience the same average improvement spread evenly across domains. Having a few very important positive aspects of the self to fall back on may help to buffer the stress of a life transition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin SAGE

Self-Differentiation and Well-Being in a Life Transition

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0146-1672
eISSN
1552-7433
DOI
10.1177/0146167296225003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous research has shown that evaluative organization of self-knowledge explains variance in self-esteem and mood beyond that accounted for by positive or negative content. Here, that model is applied to the changing self perceptions of women in a life transition. In a sample of 120 older women who had relocated within the past year, evaluative differentiation of self-change—the tendency to perceive self-change very positively in some domains and very negatively in others—was associated with greater well-being among women whose positive domains were perceived to be important. People who perceive great improvement in at least one important domain of the self (despite sacrifice in others) may be more resilient during a life transition than those who experience the same average improvement spread evenly across domains. Having a few very important positive aspects of the self to fall back on may help to buffer the stress of a life transition.

Journal

Personality and Social Psychology BulletinSAGE

Published: May 1, 1996

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