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Reconsidering the Role of Interaction in Analyzing and Reporting Focus Groups

Reconsidering the Role of Interaction in Analyzing and Reporting Focus Groups In the two sections of this article, I examine aspects of the analysis and reporting of interaction in focus groups. In both sections, I argue that the essential importance of interaction for producing the data in focus groups does not correspond to any requirement that the analysis or the reporting of that data should emphasize interaction. With regard to analyzing interaction, the goals of the research should guide the analysis of the data, and those goals might or might not emphasize interaction. In particular, a great deal of focus group research is conducted for substantive and practical purposes, where the analysis typically requires little attention to the dynamics of interaction in those groups. With regard to reporting interaction, quotations from single individuals can often be the most efficient and effectives ways to accomplish an article’s goals; however, I also discuss the kinds of situations where there are good reasons to report interaction among the participants. I conclude by briefly describing a different agenda for examining the importance of interaction in focus groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Health Research SAGE

Reconsidering the Role of Interaction in Analyzing and Reporting Focus Groups

Qualitative Health Research , Volume 20 (5): 5 – May 1, 2010

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References (13)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2010
ISSN
1049-7323
eISSN
1552-7557
DOI
10.1177/1049732310364627
pmid
20406996
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the two sections of this article, I examine aspects of the analysis and reporting of interaction in focus groups. In both sections, I argue that the essential importance of interaction for producing the data in focus groups does not correspond to any requirement that the analysis or the reporting of that data should emphasize interaction. With regard to analyzing interaction, the goals of the research should guide the analysis of the data, and those goals might or might not emphasize interaction. In particular, a great deal of focus group research is conducted for substantive and practical purposes, where the analysis typically requires little attention to the dynamics of interaction in those groups. With regard to reporting interaction, quotations from single individuals can often be the most efficient and effectives ways to accomplish an article’s goals; however, I also discuss the kinds of situations where there are good reasons to report interaction among the participants. I conclude by briefly describing a different agenda for examining the importance of interaction in focus groups.

Journal

Qualitative Health ResearchSAGE

Published: May 1, 2010

There are no references for this article.