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Quality of life of cancer patients and their spouses in palliative home care:

Quality of life of cancer patients and their spouses in palliative home care: Incurably ill cancer patients (n = 37) and their spouses, while receiving support from a hospital-based palliative service, were assessed monthly regarding quality of life, using the assessment of quality of life at the end of life instrument. Lowest ratings for patients during the final six weeks were found in the following items: ability to do what one wants, physical strength, global quality of life, and meaningfulness. The pain situation was stable over time. Generally, patients were less anxious than spouses. The least-optimal items at the end of life for the patients' partners were: ability to leave the patient unattended, need for assistance with hygiene/dressing and anxiety. Meaningfulness was the item with the strongest correlation to global quality of life, for both patients and spouses. A more ambitious approach to the existential domain appears to be essential if we wish to optimize quality of life for patients within palliative care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Palliative Medicine SAGE

Quality of life of cancer patients and their spouses in palliative home care:

Palliative Medicine , Volume 12 (1): 11 – Jul 1, 2016

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References (27)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0269-2163
eISSN
1477-030X
DOI
10.1191/026921698676629560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Incurably ill cancer patients (n = 37) and their spouses, while receiving support from a hospital-based palliative service, were assessed monthly regarding quality of life, using the assessment of quality of life at the end of life instrument. Lowest ratings for patients during the final six weeks were found in the following items: ability to do what one wants, physical strength, global quality of life, and meaningfulness. The pain situation was stable over time. Generally, patients were less anxious than spouses. The least-optimal items at the end of life for the patients' partners were: ability to leave the patient unattended, need for assistance with hygiene/dressing and anxiety. Meaningfulness was the item with the strongest correlation to global quality of life, for both patients and spouses. A more ambitious approach to the existential domain appears to be essential if we wish to optimize quality of life for patients within palliative care.

Journal

Palliative MedicineSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2016

Keywords: neoplasms,palliative care,quality of life

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