Pushing Scientists into the Marketplace: Promoting Science Entrepreneurship

Pushing Scientists into the Marketplace: Promoting Science Entrepreneurship Spring 2004 | V ol.46, No.3 | REPRINT SERIES California Review Management Pushing Scientists Into the Marketplace: Promoting Science Entrepreneurship Mark Lehrer Kazuhiro Asakawa © 2004 by The Regents of the University of California Pushing Scientists into the Marketplace: PROMOTING SCIENCE ENTREPRENEURSHIP Mark Lehrer Kazuhiro Asakawa orld War II left much of the industrialized world in ruins and conferred an unprecedented technological lead on the United States. Much of technology history since then has consisted W of the U.S. maintaining the lead in new technologies and new high-tech industries (information technology, biotechnology) while older and newly industrialized countries have caught up with and often surpassed the U.S. in technologically maturing industries. Germany and Japan are primary examples of countries that now consistently lead the U.S. technologically in established sectors such as automobiles, consumer electronics, and machine tools. The ability of the U.S. to lead development of newer high-tech sectors is usually attributed to the U.S. science base and to institutional advantages in commercializing the results of basic scientific research. Not surprisingly, then, countries like Germany and Japan have begun efforts to catch up not only in specific technologies, but in the very system of scientific research and commer- cialization http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png California Management Review SAGE

Pushing Scientists into the Marketplace: Promoting Science Entrepreneurship

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2004 The Regents of the University of California
ISSN
0008-1256
eISSN
2162-8564
D.O.I.
10.2307/41166221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spring 2004 | V ol.46, No.3 | REPRINT SERIES California Review Management Pushing Scientists Into the Marketplace: Promoting Science Entrepreneurship Mark Lehrer Kazuhiro Asakawa © 2004 by The Regents of the University of California Pushing Scientists into the Marketplace: PROMOTING SCIENCE ENTREPRENEURSHIP Mark Lehrer Kazuhiro Asakawa orld War II left much of the industrialized world in ruins and conferred an unprecedented technological lead on the United States. Much of technology history since then has consisted W of the U.S. maintaining the lead in new technologies and new high-tech industries (information technology, biotechnology) while older and newly industrialized countries have caught up with and often surpassed the U.S. in technologically maturing industries. Germany and Japan are primary examples of countries that now consistently lead the U.S. technologically in established sectors such as automobiles, consumer electronics, and machine tools. The ability of the U.S. to lead development of newer high-tech sectors is usually attributed to the U.S. science base and to institutional advantages in commercializing the results of basic scientific research. Not surprisingly, then, countries like Germany and Japan have begun efforts to catch up not only in specific technologies, but in the very system of scientific research and commer- cialization

Journal

California Management ReviewSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2004

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