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Promoting Student-Centered Learning in Experiential Education

Promoting Student-Centered Learning in Experiential Education Experiential educators claim to value student-centered learning, yet the values, as evidenced in practice, are often teacher-centered. The purpose of this article was to increase awareness of the inconsistencies between espoused values, and values in practice, effecting teacher and student power relationships during the facilitation of experiential programs. The literature review includes related philosophical topics, a summary of what other professionals in the field have written about student-centered facilitation, and an overview of eight generations of facilitation. The author argues that teacher-centered facilitation is problematic in experiential education and justifies increasing the use of student-centered facilitation practices. Suggestions are provided for: (a) establishing forums for dialog about student-centered facilitation, (b) incorporating more student-centered facilitation practices, and (c) considering student-centered learning during program development and facilitator training. The author concludes that the profession's very commitment to integrity necessitates that we, as experiential educators, take action in order to ensure that our programs become more student-centered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experiential Education SAGE

Promoting Student-Centered Learning in Experiential Education

Journal of Experiential Education , Volume 27 (2): 20 – Sep 1, 2004

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References (34)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2004 Association of Experiential Education
ISSN
1053-8259
eISSN
2169-009X
DOI
10.1177/105382590402700203
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Experiential educators claim to value student-centered learning, yet the values, as evidenced in practice, are often teacher-centered. The purpose of this article was to increase awareness of the inconsistencies between espoused values, and values in practice, effecting teacher and student power relationships during the facilitation of experiential programs. The literature review includes related philosophical topics, a summary of what other professionals in the field have written about student-centered facilitation, and an overview of eight generations of facilitation. The author argues that teacher-centered facilitation is problematic in experiential education and justifies increasing the use of student-centered facilitation practices. Suggestions are provided for: (a) establishing forums for dialog about student-centered facilitation, (b) incorporating more student-centered facilitation practices, and (c) considering student-centered learning during program development and facilitator training. The author concludes that the profession's very commitment to integrity necessitates that we, as experiential educators, take action in order to ensure that our programs become more student-centered.

Journal

Journal of Experiential EducationSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2004

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